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Body composition in children with sickle cell disease.
Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76(1):218-25AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Impaired growth, poor nutritional status, and delayed skeletal and sexual maturation are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), yet the nature of associated body-composition deficits has not been fully described.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to assess growth, nutritional status, and body composition in 36 African American children with type SS SCD (20 females and 16 males) and 30 healthy control children (15 females and 15 males) of similar age (5-18 y) and ethnicity.

DESIGN

Height, weight, bone age, pubertal status, skinfold thickness, and arm circumference were assessed. Height and weight were converted to z scores by comparison with national reference data and skinfold-thickness measurements were converted to z scores by comparison with African American- specific reference data. Fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) were estimated by using 4 methods. Prepubertal children, pubertal males, and pubertal females were analyzed separately.

RESULTS

Relative to the control subjects and to a national sample, children with SCD had significantly lower z scores for weight, height, arm circumference, and upper arm fat and muscle areas. Relative skeletal maturation was significantly delayed. After adjustment for age, children with SCD had significantly lower FM (prepubertal children and pubertal males only) and FFM (all 3 groups).

CONCLUSIONS

Children with SCD have impaired growth, delayed puberty, and poor nutritional status. Low z scores for upper arm fat area indicate deficits in fat (energy) stores, and low FFM coupled with low upper arm muscle area indicate muscle wasting and low protein stores. These body-composition abnormalities suggest that the nutritional needs of the African American children with SCD were not being met.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Boston, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12081838

Citation

Barden, Elizabeth M., et al. "Body Composition in Children With Sickle Cell Disease." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 76, no. 1, 2002, pp. 218-25.
Barden EM, Kawchak DA, Ohene-Frempong K, et al. Body composition in children with sickle cell disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(1):218-25.
Barden, E. M., Kawchak, D. A., Ohene-Frempong, K., Stallings, V. A., & Zemel, B. S. (2002). Body composition in children with sickle cell disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 76(1), pp. 218-25.
Barden EM, et al. Body Composition in Children With Sickle Cell Disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(1):218-25. PubMed PMID: 12081838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body composition in children with sickle cell disease. AU - Barden,Elizabeth M, AU - Kawchak,Deborah A, AU - Ohene-Frempong,Kwaku, AU - Stallings,Virginia A, AU - Zemel,Babette S, PY - 2002/6/26/pubmed PY - 2002/7/18/medline PY - 2002/6/26/entrez SP - 218 EP - 25 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 76 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Impaired growth, poor nutritional status, and delayed skeletal and sexual maturation are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), yet the nature of associated body-composition deficits has not been fully described. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess growth, nutritional status, and body composition in 36 African American children with type SS SCD (20 females and 16 males) and 30 healthy control children (15 females and 15 males) of similar age (5-18 y) and ethnicity. DESIGN: Height, weight, bone age, pubertal status, skinfold thickness, and arm circumference were assessed. Height and weight were converted to z scores by comparison with national reference data and skinfold-thickness measurements were converted to z scores by comparison with African American- specific reference data. Fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) were estimated by using 4 methods. Prepubertal children, pubertal males, and pubertal females were analyzed separately. RESULTS: Relative to the control subjects and to a national sample, children with SCD had significantly lower z scores for weight, height, arm circumference, and upper arm fat and muscle areas. Relative skeletal maturation was significantly delayed. After adjustment for age, children with SCD had significantly lower FM (prepubertal children and pubertal males only) and FFM (all 3 groups). CONCLUSIONS: Children with SCD have impaired growth, delayed puberty, and poor nutritional status. Low z scores for upper arm fat area indicate deficits in fat (energy) stores, and low FFM coupled with low upper arm muscle area indicate muscle wasting and low protein stores. These body-composition abnormalities suggest that the nutritional needs of the African American children with SCD were not being met. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12081838/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/76.1.218 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -