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Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.
Gastroenterol Clin North Am 2002; 31(1):1-20GC

Abstract

The incidence of IBD has either continued to increase or has stabilized at a high rate in most developed countries, whereas the incidence continues to rise in regions where IBD had been less common. The prevalence has continued to increase as a result of a combination of previously rising incidence and improved survival. Regardless of the exact prevalence, the burden of disease in North America and Europe is significant. Studying the patterns of geographic variation and age and gender distribution may yield important clues to the cause of IBD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Mayo Medical School, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. loftus.edward@mayo.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12122726

Citation

Loftus, Edward V., and William J. Sandborn. "Epidemiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease." Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, vol. 31, no. 1, 2002, pp. 1-20.
Loftus EV, Sandborn WJ. Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2002;31(1):1-20.
Loftus, E. V., & Sandborn, W. J. (2002). Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 31(1), pp. 1-20.
Loftus EV, Sandborn WJ. Epidemiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2002;31(1):1-20. PubMed PMID: 12122726.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Loftus,Edward V,Jr AU - Sandborn,William J, PY - 2002/7/19/pubmed PY - 2003/1/1/medline PY - 2002/7/19/entrez SP - 1 EP - 20 JF - Gastroenterology clinics of North America JO - Gastroenterol. Clin. North Am. VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - The incidence of IBD has either continued to increase or has stabilized at a high rate in most developed countries, whereas the incidence continues to rise in regions where IBD had been less common. The prevalence has continued to increase as a result of a combination of previously rising incidence and improved survival. Regardless of the exact prevalence, the burden of disease in North America and Europe is significant. Studying the patterns of geographic variation and age and gender distribution may yield important clues to the cause of IBD. SN - 0889-8553 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12122726/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-8553(01)00002-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -