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Diet and risk of leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study.

Abstract

Nearly 30,000 individuals ages over 21 years are diagnosed with leukemia each year in the United States. Other than benzene, radiation, and chemotherapy, which account for a small proportion of cases, there are few identified risk factors for adult leukemia. Although recent data from animal studies indicate a potentially protective role for dietary restriction in leukemogenesis, few data exist on dietary relationships in adult leukemia. Food frequency data collected at baseline (1986) were analyzed from the prospective Iowa Women's Health Study to begin to address the role of diet in adult leukemia. Data from 35,221 women ages 55-69 years were analyzed. A total of 138 women developed leukemia during the 14-year follow-up period of 1986 to 1999. With the exception of an inverse association (P trend = 0.08) with increasing consumption of all vegetables (relative risk, 0.56 and 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.88; relative risk, 0.69 and 95% confidence interval, 0.44-1.07 for medium and high consumption, respectively), there was little evidence of an important role for other dietary factors in leukemogenesis. Analyses that excluded cases diagnosed in the first 2 years from baseline did not notably alter the results. Leukemia subgroups, including acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia, were also analyzed, but no statistically significant associations with dietary factors were revealed. This study provides evidence that increased vegetable consumption may decrease the risk of adult leukemia. However, given that our study focused on older women from a defined geographical area, analyses of prospective studies in other populations are needed to confirm or refute these results.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Pediatric Epidemiology & Clinical Research, University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. ross@epi.umn.edu

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    Source

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Aged
    Diet
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Iowa
    Leukemia
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12163333

    Citation

    Ross, Julie A., et al. "Diet and Risk of Leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 11, no. 8, 2002, pp. 777-81.
    Ross JA, Kasum CM, Davies SM, et al. Diet and risk of leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(8):777-81.
    Ross, J. A., Kasum, C. M., Davies, S. M., Jacobs, D. R., Folsom, A. R., & Potter, J. D. (2002). Diet and risk of leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 11(8), pp. 777-81.
    Ross JA, et al. Diet and Risk of Leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(8):777-81. PubMed PMID: 12163333.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and risk of leukemia in the Iowa Women's Health Study. AU - Ross,Julie A, AU - Kasum,Christine M, AU - Davies,Stella M, AU - Jacobs,David R, AU - Folsom,Aaron R, AU - Potter,John D, PY - 2002/8/7/pubmed PY - 2002/9/11/medline PY - 2002/8/7/entrez SP - 777 EP - 81 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - Nearly 30,000 individuals ages over 21 years are diagnosed with leukemia each year in the United States. Other than benzene, radiation, and chemotherapy, which account for a small proportion of cases, there are few identified risk factors for adult leukemia. Although recent data from animal studies indicate a potentially protective role for dietary restriction in leukemogenesis, few data exist on dietary relationships in adult leukemia. Food frequency data collected at baseline (1986) were analyzed from the prospective Iowa Women's Health Study to begin to address the role of diet in adult leukemia. Data from 35,221 women ages 55-69 years were analyzed. A total of 138 women developed leukemia during the 14-year follow-up period of 1986 to 1999. With the exception of an inverse association (P trend = 0.08) with increasing consumption of all vegetables (relative risk, 0.56 and 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.88; relative risk, 0.69 and 95% confidence interval, 0.44-1.07 for medium and high consumption, respectively), there was little evidence of an important role for other dietary factors in leukemogenesis. Analyses that excluded cases diagnosed in the first 2 years from baseline did not notably alter the results. Leukemia subgroups, including acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia, were also analyzed, but no statistically significant associations with dietary factors were revealed. This study provides evidence that increased vegetable consumption may decrease the risk of adult leukemia. However, given that our study focused on older women from a defined geographical area, analyses of prospective studies in other populations are needed to confirm or refute these results. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12163333/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12163333 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -