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Plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) levels as risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease in epileptic children taking anticonvulsants.
Acta Paediatr 2002; 91(9):923-6AP

Abstract

AIM

To assess the effect of anticonvulsant treatment on plasma homocysteine level and lipoprotein (a) in epileptic children.

METHODS

Plasma total homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12 and lipoprotein (a) concentrations were measured in 111 epilectic children taking anticonvulsant drugs for longer than 12 mo. Forty-six healthy, sex- and age-matched children served as controls.

RESULTS

Patients and controls differed significantly in concentrations of homocysteine (p < 0.05) and lipoprotein (a) (p < 0.001). The number of patients with homocysteine concentrations of >9 microM was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. A significant inverse relationship was found between vitamin B12 folate levels and plasma homocysteine levels in the patient group; 28.8% of the patient group had lipoprotein (a) concentrations above the cut-off value (30 mg/dl) for increased risk of early atherosclerosis, whereas none of the control patients had concentrations above this value.

CONCLUSION

These data indicate that prolonged anticonvulsant treatment could increase plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) concentrations and that it may be useful to measure the levels routinely in order to prevent atherosclerosis in epileptic children taking anticonvulsant drugs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Metabolism and Nutrition, Ankara, Turkey. tumerleyla@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12412866

Citation

Tümer, L, et al. "Plasma Homocysteine and Lipoprotein (a) Levels as Risk Factors for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease in Epileptic Children Taking Anticonvulsants." Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), vol. 91, no. 9, 2002, pp. 923-6.
Tümer L, Serdaroğlu A, Hasanoğlu A, et al. Plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) levels as risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease in epileptic children taking anticonvulsants. Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(9):923-6.
Tümer, L., Serdaroğlu, A., Hasanoğlu, A., Biberoğlu, G., & Aksoy, E. (2002). Plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) levels as risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease in epileptic children taking anticonvulsants. Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), 91(9), pp. 923-6.
Tümer L, et al. Plasma Homocysteine and Lipoprotein (a) Levels as Risk Factors for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease in Epileptic Children Taking Anticonvulsants. Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(9):923-6. PubMed PMID: 12412866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) levels as risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease in epileptic children taking anticonvulsants. AU - Tümer,L, AU - Serdaroğlu,A, AU - Hasanoğlu,A, AU - Biberoğlu,G, AU - Aksoy,E, PY - 2002/11/5/pubmed PY - 2003/2/7/medline PY - 2002/11/5/entrez SP - 923 EP - 6 JF - Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) JO - Acta Paediatr. VL - 91 IS - 9 N2 - AIM: To assess the effect of anticonvulsant treatment on plasma homocysteine level and lipoprotein (a) in epileptic children. METHODS: Plasma total homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12 and lipoprotein (a) concentrations were measured in 111 epilectic children taking anticonvulsant drugs for longer than 12 mo. Forty-six healthy, sex- and age-matched children served as controls. RESULTS: Patients and controls differed significantly in concentrations of homocysteine (p < 0.05) and lipoprotein (a) (p < 0.001). The number of patients with homocysteine concentrations of >9 microM was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. A significant inverse relationship was found between vitamin B12 folate levels and plasma homocysteine levels in the patient group; 28.8% of the patient group had lipoprotein (a) concentrations above the cut-off value (30 mg/dl) for increased risk of early atherosclerosis, whereas none of the control patients had concentrations above this value. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that prolonged anticonvulsant treatment could increase plasma homocysteine and lipoprotein (a) concentrations and that it may be useful to measure the levels routinely in order to prevent atherosclerosis in epileptic children taking anticonvulsant drugs. SN - 0803-5253 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12412866/full_citation L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0803-5253&amp;date=2002&amp;volume=91&amp;issue=9&amp;spage=923 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -