Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The associations of diet with serum insulin-like growth factor I and its main binding proteins in 292 women meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2002; 11(11):1441-8CE

Abstract

The lower rates of some cancers in Asian countries than in Western countries may be partly because of diet, although the mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether a plant-based (vegan) diet is associated with a lower circulating level of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) compared with a meat-eating or lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet among 292 British women, ages 20-70 years. The mean serum IGF-I concentration was 13% lower in 92 vegan women compared with 99 meat-eaters and 101 vegetarians (P = 0.0006). The mean concentrations of both serum IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP-2 were 20-40% higher in vegan women compared with meat-eaters and vegetarians (P = 0.005 and P = 0.0008 for IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2, respectively). There were no significant differences in IGFBP-3, C-peptide, or sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations between the diet groups. Intake of protein rich in essential amino acids was positively associated with serum IGF-I (Pearson partial correlation coefficient; r = 0.27; P < 0.0001) and explained most of the differences in IGF-I concentration between the diet groups. These data suggest that a plant-based diet is associated with lower circulating levels of total IGF-I and higher levels of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Research United Kingdom Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6HE, United Kingdom. naomi.allen@cancer.org.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12433724

Citation

Allen, Naomi E., et al. "The Associations of Diet With Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I and Its Main Binding Proteins in 292 Women Meat-eaters, Vegetarians, and Vegans." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 11, no. 11, 2002, pp. 1441-8.
Allen NE, Appleby PN, Davey GK, et al. The associations of diet with serum insulin-like growth factor I and its main binding proteins in 292 women meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(11):1441-8.
Allen, N. E., Appleby, P. N., Davey, G. K., Kaaks, R., Rinaldi, S., & Key, T. J. (2002). The associations of diet with serum insulin-like growth factor I and its main binding proteins in 292 women meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 11(11), pp. 1441-8.
Allen NE, et al. The Associations of Diet With Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I and Its Main Binding Proteins in 292 Women Meat-eaters, Vegetarians, and Vegans. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(11):1441-8. PubMed PMID: 12433724.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The associations of diet with serum insulin-like growth factor I and its main binding proteins in 292 women meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans. AU - Allen,Naomi E, AU - Appleby,Paul N, AU - Davey,Gwyneth K, AU - Kaaks,Rudolf, AU - Rinaldi,Sabina, AU - Key,Timothy J, PY - 2002/11/16/pubmed PY - 2003/3/8/medline PY - 2002/11/16/entrez SP - 1441 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 11 IS - 11 N2 - The lower rates of some cancers in Asian countries than in Western countries may be partly because of diet, although the mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether a plant-based (vegan) diet is associated with a lower circulating level of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) compared with a meat-eating or lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet among 292 British women, ages 20-70 years. The mean serum IGF-I concentration was 13% lower in 92 vegan women compared with 99 meat-eaters and 101 vegetarians (P = 0.0006). The mean concentrations of both serum IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP-2 were 20-40% higher in vegan women compared with meat-eaters and vegetarians (P = 0.005 and P = 0.0008 for IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2, respectively). There were no significant differences in IGFBP-3, C-peptide, or sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations between the diet groups. Intake of protein rich in essential amino acids was positively associated with serum IGF-I (Pearson partial correlation coefficient; r = 0.27; P < 0.0001) and explained most of the differences in IGF-I concentration between the diet groups. These data suggest that a plant-based diet is associated with lower circulating levels of total IGF-I and higher levels of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12433724/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12433724 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -