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A prospective study of the relationship between body mass index and cataract extraction among US women and men.
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2002; 26(12):1588-95IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity may influence several physiologic processes involved in cataract formation such as oxidative stress, glycosylation and osmotic stress.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between increased body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cataract extraction.

DESIGN AND SETTING

The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, both prospective cohort studies of US women and men.

SUBJECTS

A total of 87 682 women and 45 549 men aged 45 y and older who did not have diagnosed cataract or cancer at baseline (1980 for women, 1986 for men).

MEASUREMENTS

Cataract extractions occurring between baseline and 1996, confirmed by medical records.

RESULTS

During 16 y of follow-up in the women, and 10 y in the men, (1 097 997 person-y), 4430 incident cases were documented. Compared to participants with BMI less than 23 kg/m(2), those with BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m(2) had 36% higher risk of any type of cataract (pooled multivariate relative risk (RR), 1.36; 95% CI, 1.23-1.49) after adjusting for smoking, age and lutein/zeaxanthin intake. The association was strongest for posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract (pooled multivariate RR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.55-2.55). With adjustment for diabetes, the RR of obesity associated with posterior subcapsular cataract was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.30-2.17). Obesity was not significantly associated with nuclear cataract.

CONCLUSION

Obesity increases the risk of developing cataract overall, and of PSC cataract in particular; the etiology of PSC cataract may be mediated at least in part by glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, even in the absence of clinical diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. june.weintraub@sfdph.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12461675

Citation

Weintraub, J M., et al. "A Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Cataract Extraction Among US Women and Men." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 26, no. 12, 2002, pp. 1588-95.
Weintraub JM, Willett WC, Rosner B, et al. A prospective study of the relationship between body mass index and cataract extraction among US women and men. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(12):1588-95.
Weintraub, J. M., Willett, W. C., Rosner, B., Colditz, G. A., Seddon, J. M., & Hankinson, S. E. (2002). A prospective study of the relationship between body mass index and cataract extraction among US women and men. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 26(12), pp. 1588-95.
Weintraub JM, et al. A Prospective Study of the Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Cataract Extraction Among US Women and Men. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002;26(12):1588-95. PubMed PMID: 12461675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of the relationship between body mass index and cataract extraction among US women and men. AU - Weintraub,J M, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Rosner,B, AU - Colditz,G A, AU - Seddon,J M, AU - Hankinson,S E, PY - 2001/08/29/received PY - 2002/06/10/revised PY - 2002/06/19/accepted PY - 2002/12/4/pubmed PY - 2003/2/14/medline PY - 2002/12/4/entrez SP - 1588 EP - 95 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. VL - 26 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity may influence several physiologic processes involved in cataract formation such as oxidative stress, glycosylation and osmotic stress. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between increased body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cataract extraction. DESIGN AND SETTING: The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, both prospective cohort studies of US women and men. SUBJECTS: A total of 87 682 women and 45 549 men aged 45 y and older who did not have diagnosed cataract or cancer at baseline (1980 for women, 1986 for men). MEASUREMENTS: Cataract extractions occurring between baseline and 1996, confirmed by medical records. RESULTS: During 16 y of follow-up in the women, and 10 y in the men, (1 097 997 person-y), 4430 incident cases were documented. Compared to participants with BMI less than 23 kg/m(2), those with BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m(2) had 36% higher risk of any type of cataract (pooled multivariate relative risk (RR), 1.36; 95% CI, 1.23-1.49) after adjusting for smoking, age and lutein/zeaxanthin intake. The association was strongest for posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract (pooled multivariate RR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.55-2.55). With adjustment for diabetes, the RR of obesity associated with posterior subcapsular cataract was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.30-2.17). Obesity was not significantly associated with nuclear cataract. CONCLUSION: Obesity increases the risk of developing cataract overall, and of PSC cataract in particular; the etiology of PSC cataract may be mediated at least in part by glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, even in the absence of clinical diabetes. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12461675/full_citation L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/obesity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -