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Epidemiology of lung cancer.

Abstract

In the United States, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women even though an extensive list of risk factors has been well-characterized. Far and away the most important cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke through active or passive smoking. The reductions in smoking prevalence in men that occurred in the late 1960s through the 1980s will continue to drive the lung cancer mortality rates downward in men during the first portion of this century. This favorable trend will not persist unless further reductions in smoking prevalence are achieved.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. aalberg@jhsph.edu

    Source

    Chest 123:1 Suppl 2003 Jan pg 21S-49S

    MeSH

    Diet
    Environmental Exposure
    Female
    Global Health
    Humans
    Lung Neoplasms
    Male
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12527563

    Citation

    Alberg, Anthony J., and Jonathan M. Samet. "Epidemiology of Lung Cancer." Chest, vol. 123, no. 1 Suppl, 2003, 21S-49S.
    Alberg AJ, Samet JM. Epidemiology of lung cancer. Chest. 2003;123(1 Suppl):21S-49S.
    Alberg, A. J., & Samet, J. M. (2003). Epidemiology of lung cancer. Chest, 123(1 Suppl), 21S-49S.
    Alberg AJ, Samet JM. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer. Chest. 2003;123(1 Suppl):21S-49S. PubMed PMID: 12527563.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of lung cancer. AU - Alberg,Anthony J, AU - Samet,Jonathan M, PY - 2003/1/16/pubmed PY - 2003/3/5/medline PY - 2003/1/16/entrez SP - 21S EP - 49S JF - Chest JO - Chest VL - 123 IS - 1 Suppl N2 - In the United States, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women even though an extensive list of risk factors has been well-characterized. Far and away the most important cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke through active or passive smoking. The reductions in smoking prevalence in men that occurred in the late 1960s through the 1980s will continue to drive the lung cancer mortality rates downward in men during the first portion of this century. This favorable trend will not persist unless further reductions in smoking prevalence are achieved. SN - 0012-3692 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12527563/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0012-3692(15)32981-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -