Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in reproductive-age women: a review of randomized controlled trials.
Reprod Toxicol 2003 Mar-Apr; 17(2):137-52RT

Abstract

PURPOSE

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are widely used in the general population. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials of CAM therapies for obstetrical and gynecologic conditions and presents therapies that are likely to be used by women of reproductive age and by pregnant women.

DATA SOURCES

Sources included English-language papers in MEDLINE 1966-2002 and AMED (1985-2000) and the authors' extensive holdings.

STUDY SELECTION

Randomized controlled clinical trials of CAM therapies for obstetric and gynecologic conditions.

DATA EXTRACTION

Clinical information was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text.

DATA SYNTHESIS

Ninety-three trials were identified, 45 of which were for pregnancy-related conditions, 33 of which were for premenstrual syndrome, and 13 of which were for dysmenorrhea. Data support the use of acupressure for nausea of pregnancy and calcium for PMS. Preliminary studies indicate a role for further research on Vitamin B6 or ginger for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy; calcium, magnesium, Vitamin B6, or chaste-tree berry extract for PMS; and a low-fat diet, exercise, or fish oil supplementation for dysmenorrhea.

CONCLUSIONS

Limited evidence supports the efficacy of some CAM therapies. Exposure of women of reproductive age to these therapies can be expected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rosenthal Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 20036, Washington, DC, USA. fughberman@aol.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12642146

Citation

Fugh-Berman, Adriane, and Fredi Kronenberg. "Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in Reproductive-age Women: a Review of Randomized Controlled Trials." Reproductive Toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.), vol. 17, no. 2, 2003, pp. 137-52.
Fugh-Berman A, Kronenberg F. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in reproductive-age women: a review of randomized controlled trials. Reprod Toxicol. 2003;17(2):137-52.
Fugh-Berman, A., & Kronenberg, F. (2003). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in reproductive-age women: a review of randomized controlled trials. Reproductive Toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.), 17(2), pp. 137-52.
Fugh-Berman A, Kronenberg F. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in Reproductive-age Women: a Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Reprod Toxicol. 2003;17(2):137-52. PubMed PMID: 12642146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in reproductive-age women: a review of randomized controlled trials. AU - Fugh-Berman,Adriane, AU - Kronenberg,Fredi, PY - 2003/3/19/pubmed PY - 2003/10/28/medline PY - 2003/3/19/entrez SP - 137 EP - 52 JF - Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.) JO - Reprod. Toxicol. VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are widely used in the general population. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials of CAM therapies for obstetrical and gynecologic conditions and presents therapies that are likely to be used by women of reproductive age and by pregnant women. DATA SOURCES: Sources included English-language papers in MEDLINE 1966-2002 and AMED (1985-2000) and the authors' extensive holdings. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled clinical trials of CAM therapies for obstetric and gynecologic conditions. DATA EXTRACTION: Clinical information was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text. DATA SYNTHESIS: Ninety-three trials were identified, 45 of which were for pregnancy-related conditions, 33 of which were for premenstrual syndrome, and 13 of which were for dysmenorrhea. Data support the use of acupressure for nausea of pregnancy and calcium for PMS. Preliminary studies indicate a role for further research on Vitamin B6 or ginger for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy; calcium, magnesium, Vitamin B6, or chaste-tree berry extract for PMS; and a low-fat diet, exercise, or fish oil supplementation for dysmenorrhea. CONCLUSIONS: Limited evidence supports the efficacy of some CAM therapies. Exposure of women of reproductive age to these therapies can be expected. SN - 0890-6238 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12642146/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890623802001284 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -