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Protein intake is positively associated with body cell mass in weight-stable HIV-infected men.

Abstract

Depletion of body cell mass (BCM) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients is strongly associated with disease progression and death. Although whole-body protein turnover is increased in HIV infection, it is not known whether protein intake is independently associated with BCM. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations, if any, between protein intake and several body composition variables in 467 weight-stable, HIV-infected men with CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) enrolled in a multicenter nutritional supplementation trial. Baseline BCM, total body fat and extracellular mass as measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, dietary intake (24 h food recall) and muscle building activity assessed by structured interview were analyzed to determine association(s) between body composition variables and macronutrient intake. Multiple regression analysis showed that BCM was positively associated with body weight (P = 0.001), height (P < 0.001), protein intake (P < 0.001), muscle-building activity (P < 0.001) and African-American ethnicity (P < 0.05) and negatively associated with carbohydrate intake (P < 0.05), age (P < 0.001) and number of prior AIDS-related diagnoses (P < 0.001). We conclude that protein intake is associated with increased BCM, whereas carbohydrate intake is negatively associated with BCM in HIV-infected men, independently of muscle building activity.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, USA. bwilliams@salud.unm.edu

    , , , ,

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 133:4 2003 Apr pg 1143-6

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Weight
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dietary Proteins
    HIV Infections
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12672933

    Citation

    Williams, S Bruce, et al. "Protein Intake Is Positively Associated With Body Cell Mass in Weight-stable HIV-infected Men." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 133, no. 4, 2003, pp. 1143-6.
    Williams SB, Bartsch G, Muurahainen N, et al. Protein intake is positively associated with body cell mass in weight-stable HIV-infected men. J Nutr. 2003;133(4):1143-6.
    Williams, S. B., Bartsch, G., Muurahainen, N., Collins, G., Raghavan, S. S., & Wheeler, D. (2003). Protein intake is positively associated with body cell mass in weight-stable HIV-infected men. The Journal of Nutrition, 133(4), pp. 1143-6.
    Williams SB, et al. Protein Intake Is Positively Associated With Body Cell Mass in Weight-stable HIV-infected Men. J Nutr. 2003;133(4):1143-6. PubMed PMID: 12672933.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Protein intake is positively associated with body cell mass in weight-stable HIV-infected men. AU - Williams,S Bruce, AU - Bartsch,Glenn, AU - Muurahainen,Norma, AU - Collins,Gary, AU - Raghavan,Subhasree Sai, AU - Wheeler,David, PY - 2003/4/4/pubmed PY - 2003/5/6/medline PY - 2003/4/4/entrez SP - 1143 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 133 IS - 4 N2 - Depletion of body cell mass (BCM) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients is strongly associated with disease progression and death. Although whole-body protein turnover is increased in HIV infection, it is not known whether protein intake is independently associated with BCM. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations, if any, between protein intake and several body composition variables in 467 weight-stable, HIV-infected men with CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) enrolled in a multicenter nutritional supplementation trial. Baseline BCM, total body fat and extracellular mass as measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, dietary intake (24 h food recall) and muscle building activity assessed by structured interview were analyzed to determine association(s) between body composition variables and macronutrient intake. Multiple regression analysis showed that BCM was positively associated with body weight (P = 0.001), height (P < 0.001), protein intake (P < 0.001), muscle-building activity (P < 0.001) and African-American ethnicity (P < 0.05) and negatively associated with carbohydrate intake (P < 0.05), age (P < 0.001) and number of prior AIDS-related diagnoses (P < 0.001). We conclude that protein intake is associated with increased BCM, whereas carbohydrate intake is negatively associated with BCM in HIV-infected men, independently of muscle building activity. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12672933/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/133.4.1143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -