Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Past exposure to sun, skin phenotype, and risk of multiple sclerosis: case-control study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether past high sun exposure is associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis.

DESIGN

Population based case-control study.

SETTING

Tasmania, latitudes 41-3 degrees S.

PARTICIPANTS

136 cases with multiple sclerosis and 272 controls randomly drawn from the community and matched on sex and year of birth.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Multiple sclerosis defined by both clinical and magnetic resonance imaging criteria.

RESULTS

Higher sun exposure when aged 6-15 years (average 2-3 hours or more a day in summer during weekends and holidays) was associated with a decreased risk of multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.59). Higher exposure in winter seemed more important than higher exposure in summer. Greater actinic damage was also independently associated with a decreased risk of multiple sclerosis (0.32, 0.11 to 0.88 for grades 4-6 disease). A dose-response relation was observed between multiple sclerosis and decreasing sun exposure when aged 6-15 years and with actinic damage.

CONCLUSION

Higher sun exposure during childhood and early adolescence is associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis. Insufficient ultraviolet radiation may therefore influence the development of multiple sclerosis.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Menzies Centre for Population Health Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia. Ingrid.vanderMei@utas.edu.au

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    BMJ (Clinical research ed.) 327:7410 2003 Aug 09 pg 316

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age of Onset
    Case-Control Studies
    Child
    Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
    Environmental Exposure
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Odds Ratio
    Phenotype
    Photosensitivity Disorders
    Risk Factors
    Seasons
    Sunlight

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12907484

    Citation

    van der Mei, I A F., et al. "Past Exposure to Sun, Skin Phenotype, and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis: Case-control Study." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 327, no. 7410, 2003, p. 316.
    van der Mei IA, Ponsonby AL, Dwyer T, et al. Past exposure to sun, skin phenotype, and risk of multiple sclerosis: case-control study. BMJ. 2003;327(7410):316.
    van der Mei, I. A., Ponsonby, A. L., Dwyer, T., Blizzard, L., Simmons, R., Taylor, B. V., ... Kilpatrick, T. (2003). Past exposure to sun, skin phenotype, and risk of multiple sclerosis: case-control study. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 327(7410), p. 316.
    van der Mei IA, et al. Past Exposure to Sun, Skin Phenotype, and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis: Case-control Study. BMJ. 2003 Aug 9;327(7410):316. PubMed PMID: 12907484.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Past exposure to sun, skin phenotype, and risk of multiple sclerosis: case-control study. AU - van der Mei,I A F, AU - Ponsonby,A-L, AU - Dwyer,T, AU - Blizzard,L, AU - Simmons,R, AU - Taylor,B V, AU - Butzkueven,H, AU - Kilpatrick,T, PY - 2003/8/9/pubmed PY - 2003/8/26/medline PY - 2003/8/9/entrez SP - 316 EP - 316 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 327 IS - 7410 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether past high sun exposure is associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis. DESIGN: Population based case-control study. SETTING: Tasmania, latitudes 41-3 degrees S. PARTICIPANTS: 136 cases with multiple sclerosis and 272 controls randomly drawn from the community and matched on sex and year of birth. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Multiple sclerosis defined by both clinical and magnetic resonance imaging criteria. RESULTS: Higher sun exposure when aged 6-15 years (average 2-3 hours or more a day in summer during weekends and holidays) was associated with a decreased risk of multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.59). Higher exposure in winter seemed more important than higher exposure in summer. Greater actinic damage was also independently associated with a decreased risk of multiple sclerosis (0.32, 0.11 to 0.88 for grades 4-6 disease). A dose-response relation was observed between multiple sclerosis and decreasing sun exposure when aged 6-15 years and with actinic damage. CONCLUSION: Higher sun exposure during childhood and early adolescence is associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis. Insufficient ultraviolet radiation may therefore influence the development of multiple sclerosis. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12907484/full_citation L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12907484 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -