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Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study.

Abstract

In a 1994-1998 cross-sectional study of a multiethnic sample of 2,211 men and women in San Diego, California, the authors estimated prevalence of the major manifestations of chronic venous disease: spider veins, varicose veins, trophic changes, and edema by visual inspection; superficial and deep functional disease (reflux or obstruction) by duplex ultrasonography; and venous thrombotic events based on history. Venous disease increased with age, and, compared with Hispanics, African Americans, and Asians, non-Hispanic Whites had more disease. Spider veins, varicose veins, superficial functional disease, and superficial thrombotic events were more common in women than men (odds ratio (OR) = 5.4, OR = 2.2, OR = 1.9, and OR = 1.9, respectively; p < 0.05), but trophic changes and deep functional disease were less common in women (OR = 0.7 for both; p < 0.05). Visible (varicose veins or trophic changes) and functional (superficial or deep) disease were closely linked; 92.0% of legs were concordant and 8.0% discordant. For legs evidencing both trophic changes and deep functional disease, the age-adjusted prevalences of edema, superficial events, and deep events were 48.2%, 11.3%, and 24.6%, respectively, compared with 1.7%, 0.6%, and 1.3% for legs visibly and functionally normal. However, visible disease did not invariably predict functional disease, or vice versa, and venous thrombotic events occurred in the absence of either.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093, USA. mcriqui@uscd.edu

    , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 158:5 2003 Sep 01 pg 448-56

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    California
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Cultural Diversity
    Edema
    Ethnic Groups
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Hispanic Americans
    Humans
    Leg
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Peripheral Vascular Diseases
    Prevalence
    Random Allocation
    Sex Distribution
    Telangiectasis
    Varicose Veins
    Venous Thrombosis

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12936900

    Citation

    Criqui, Michael H., et al. "Chronic Venous Disease in an Ethnically Diverse Population: the San Diego Population Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 158, no. 5, 2003, pp. 448-56.
    Criqui MH, Jamosmos M, Fronek A, et al. Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2003;158(5):448-56.
    Criqui, M. H., Jamosmos, M., Fronek, A., Denenberg, J. O., Langer, R. D., Bergan, J., & Golomb, B. A. (2003). Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 158(5), pp. 448-56.
    Criqui MH, et al. Chronic Venous Disease in an Ethnically Diverse Population: the San Diego Population Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Sep 1;158(5):448-56. PubMed PMID: 12936900.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Chronic venous disease in an ethnically diverse population: the San Diego Population Study. AU - Criqui,Michael H, AU - Jamosmos,Maritess, AU - Fronek,Arnost, AU - Denenberg,Julie O, AU - Langer,Robert D, AU - Bergan,John, AU - Golomb,Beatrice A, PY - 2003/8/26/pubmed PY - 2003/9/26/medline PY - 2003/8/26/entrez SP - 448 EP - 56 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 158 IS - 5 N2 - In a 1994-1998 cross-sectional study of a multiethnic sample of 2,211 men and women in San Diego, California, the authors estimated prevalence of the major manifestations of chronic venous disease: spider veins, varicose veins, trophic changes, and edema by visual inspection; superficial and deep functional disease (reflux or obstruction) by duplex ultrasonography; and venous thrombotic events based on history. Venous disease increased with age, and, compared with Hispanics, African Americans, and Asians, non-Hispanic Whites had more disease. Spider veins, varicose veins, superficial functional disease, and superficial thrombotic events were more common in women than men (odds ratio (OR) = 5.4, OR = 2.2, OR = 1.9, and OR = 1.9, respectively; p < 0.05), but trophic changes and deep functional disease were less common in women (OR = 0.7 for both; p < 0.05). Visible (varicose veins or trophic changes) and functional (superficial or deep) disease were closely linked; 92.0% of legs were concordant and 8.0% discordant. For legs evidencing both trophic changes and deep functional disease, the age-adjusted prevalences of edema, superficial events, and deep events were 48.2%, 11.3%, and 24.6%, respectively, compared with 1.7%, 0.6%, and 1.3% for legs visibly and functionally normal. However, visible disease did not invariably predict functional disease, or vice versa, and venous thrombotic events occurred in the absence of either. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12936900/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwg166 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -