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Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.

Abstract

Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    The American journal of clinical nutrition 78:3 Suppl 2003 09 pg 610S-616S

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Clinical Trials as Topic
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Edible Grain
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nuts
    Phytosterols
    Soybean Proteins

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12936955

    Citation

    Jenkins, David J A., et al. "Type 2 Diabetes and the Vegetarian Diet." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 78, no. 3 Suppl, 2003, 610S-616S.
    Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, et al. Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    Jenkins, D. J., Kendall, C. W., Marchie, A., Jenkins, A. L., Augustin, L. S., Ludwig, D. S., ... Anderson, J. W. (2003). Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 78(3 Suppl), 610S-616S. doi:10.1093/ajcn/78.3.610S.
    Jenkins DJ, et al. Type 2 Diabetes and the Vegetarian Diet. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S. PubMed PMID: 12936955.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet. AU - Jenkins,David J A, AU - Kendall,Cyril W C, AU - Marchie,Augustine, AU - Jenkins,Alexandra L, AU - Augustin,Livia S A, AU - Ludwig,David S, AU - Barnard,Neal D, AU - Anderson,James W, PY - 2003/8/26/pubmed PY - 2003/9/17/medline PY - 2003/8/26/entrez SP - 610S EP - 616S JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 78 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg, almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12936955/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/78.3.610S DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -