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Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study.

Abstract

We conducted a population-based case-control study of inflammatory bowel disease and dietary habits in Stockholm during 1984-1987. We obtained retrospective information about food intake 5 years previously by a postal questionnaire for 152 cases with Crohn's disease, 145 cases with ulcerative colitis, and 305 controls. The relative risk of Crohn's disease was increased for subjects who had a high (55 gm or more per day) intake of sucrose (relative risk = 2.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.4-5.0) and was decreased for subjects who had a high (15 gm or more per day) intake of fiber (relative risk = 0.5, 95% confidence interval = 0.3-0.9). The most striking finding was an increased relative risk of both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis associated with consumption of fast foods: the relative risk associated with consumption of fast foods at least two times a week was estimated at 3.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.3-9.3) for Crohn's disease and 3.9 (95% confidence interval = 1.4-10.6) for ulcerative colitis. Although coffee seemed to provide a protective effect for both diseases, there are reasons to consider this finding an artifact.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

    ,

    Source

    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 3:1 1992 Jan pg 47-52

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Case-Control Studies
    Coffee
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Diet
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Dietary Fiber
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Retrospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Sweden

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    1313310

    Citation

    Persson, P G., et al. "Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a Case-control Study." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 3, no. 1, 1992, pp. 47-52.
    Persson PG, Ahlbom A, Hellers G. Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study. Epidemiology. 1992;3(1):47-52.
    Persson, P. G., Ahlbom, A., & Hellers, G. (1992). Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 3(1), pp. 47-52.
    Persson PG, Ahlbom A, Hellers G. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a Case-control Study. Epidemiology. 1992;3(1):47-52. PubMed PMID: 1313310.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study. AU - Persson,P G, AU - Ahlbom,A, AU - Hellers,G, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 47 EP - 52 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 3 IS - 1 N2 - We conducted a population-based case-control study of inflammatory bowel disease and dietary habits in Stockholm during 1984-1987. We obtained retrospective information about food intake 5 years previously by a postal questionnaire for 152 cases with Crohn's disease, 145 cases with ulcerative colitis, and 305 controls. The relative risk of Crohn's disease was increased for subjects who had a high (55 gm or more per day) intake of sucrose (relative risk = 2.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.4-5.0) and was decreased for subjects who had a high (15 gm or more per day) intake of fiber (relative risk = 0.5, 95% confidence interval = 0.3-0.9). The most striking finding was an increased relative risk of both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis associated with consumption of fast foods: the relative risk associated with consumption of fast foods at least two times a week was estimated at 3.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.3-9.3) for Crohn's disease and 3.9 (95% confidence interval = 1.4-10.6) for ulcerative colitis. Although coffee seemed to provide a protective effect for both diseases, there are reasons to consider this finding an artifact. SN - 1044-3983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1313310/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=1313310.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -