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Technique for training schizophrenic patients in illness self-management: a controlled trial.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether schizophrenic outpatients receiving low-dose neuroleptic therapy could learn and retain complex information and skills related to self-management of their illness, a novel technique of teaching, using cognitive and behavioral methods, was designed to compensate for the patients' learning disabilities.

METHOD

The subjects were 41 patients with DSM-III-R schizophrenia who were receiving constant maintenance neuroleptic drug therapy. They were randomly assigned to structured, modularized skills training or to supportive group psychotherapy.

RESULTS

The patients who received skills training made significant gains in each of the areas taught, while those participating in group therapy did not. The skills learned during training were retained without significant erosion over a 1-year follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

The effectiveness of modularized teaching of illness self-management skills to schizophrenic patients appears to be largely independent of baseline psychology and symptom improvement. Such an approach is useful for overcoming or compensating for the enduring cognitive and information processing deficits commonly found in schizophrenia.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Clinical Research Center for Schizophrenia and Psychiatric Rehabilitation, University of California, School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    The American journal of psychiatry 149:11 1992 Nov pg 1549-55

    MeSH

    Activities of Daily Living
    Adult
    Ambulatory Care
    Antipsychotic Agents
    Audiovisual Aids
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Patient Education as Topic
    Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
    Psychotherapy, Group
    Role Playing
    Schizophrenia
    Schizophrenic Psychology
    Self Care
    Teaching Materials

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    1384364

    Citation

    Eckman, T A., et al. "Technique for Training Schizophrenic Patients in Illness Self-management: a Controlled Trial." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 149, no. 11, 1992, pp. 1549-55.
    Eckman TA, Wirshing WC, Marder SR, et al. Technique for training schizophrenic patients in illness self-management: a controlled trial. Am J Psychiatry. 1992;149(11):1549-55.
    Eckman, T. A., Wirshing, W. C., Marder, S. R., Liberman, R. P., Johnston-Cronk, K., Zimmermann, K., & Mintz, J. (1992). Technique for training schizophrenic patients in illness self-management: a controlled trial. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 149(11), pp. 1549-55.
    Eckman TA, et al. Technique for Training Schizophrenic Patients in Illness Self-management: a Controlled Trial. Am J Psychiatry. 1992;149(11):1549-55. PubMed PMID: 1384364.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Technique for training schizophrenic patients in illness self-management: a controlled trial. AU - Eckman,T A, AU - Wirshing,W C, AU - Marder,S R, AU - Liberman,R P, AU - Johnston-Cronk,K, AU - Zimmermann,K, AU - Mintz,J, PY - 1992/11/1/pubmed PY - 1992/11/1/medline PY - 1992/11/1/entrez SP - 1549 EP - 55 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 149 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether schizophrenic outpatients receiving low-dose neuroleptic therapy could learn and retain complex information and skills related to self-management of their illness, a novel technique of teaching, using cognitive and behavioral methods, was designed to compensate for the patients' learning disabilities. METHOD: The subjects were 41 patients with DSM-III-R schizophrenia who were receiving constant maintenance neuroleptic drug therapy. They were randomly assigned to structured, modularized skills training or to supportive group psychotherapy. RESULTS: The patients who received skills training made significant gains in each of the areas taught, while those participating in group therapy did not. The skills learned during training were retained without significant erosion over a 1-year follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of modularized teaching of illness self-management skills to schizophrenic patients appears to be largely independent of baseline psychology and symptom improvement. Such an approach is useful for overcoming or compensating for the enduring cognitive and information processing deficits commonly found in schizophrenia. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1384364/full_citation L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/ajp.149.11.1549?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -