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Pathways to hysterectomy: insights from longitudinal twin research.
Am J Obstet Gynecol 1992; 167(1):82-8AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We hypothesized that genetic influences act on "liability" to hysterectomy, that secular influences might differentially affect relative importance of genetic and environmental influences, and that the sources of genetic influences could be identified from reported risk factors.

STUDY DESIGN

Hysterectomy data from an Australia-wide volunteer sample of female adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins are reported. In 1980 through 1982 a mailed questionnaire was completed by 1232 monozygotic female twin pairs and 751 dizygotic female twin pairs (3966 women) from the Australian Twin Register (wave 1). The same twins were surveyed by questionnaire 8 years later (wave 2).

RESULTS

A total of 366 had undergone hysterectomy by wave 1 and a further 198 at wave 2. The twin-pair correlations for liability to hysterectomy at wave 1 (0.61 +/- 0.06 for monozygotic and 0.20 +/- 0.11 for dizygotic) and wave 2 (0.65 +/- 0.05 for monozygotic and 0.32 +/- 0.09 for monozygotic) indicated a substantial genetic contribution. Reported risk factors accounted for only 15% of total variance.

CONCLUSION

Genetic influences on liability to hysterectomy were substantial and stable across birth cohorts, but the important sources of genetic influence on liability to hysterectomy are yet to be identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1442963

Citation

Treloar, S A., et al. "Pathways to Hysterectomy: Insights From Longitudinal Twin Research." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 167, no. 1, 1992, pp. 82-8.
Treloar SA, Martin NG, Dennerstein L, et al. Pathways to hysterectomy: insights from longitudinal twin research. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992;167(1):82-8.
Treloar, S. A., Martin, N. G., Dennerstein, L., Raphael, B., & Heath, A. C. (1992). Pathways to hysterectomy: insights from longitudinal twin research. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 167(1), pp. 82-8.
Treloar SA, et al. Pathways to Hysterectomy: Insights From Longitudinal Twin Research. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992;167(1):82-8. PubMed PMID: 1442963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathways to hysterectomy: insights from longitudinal twin research. AU - Treloar,S A, AU - Martin,N G, AU - Dennerstein,L, AU - Raphael,B, AU - Heath,A C, PY - 1992/7/1/pubmed PY - 1992/7/1/medline PY - 1992/7/1/entrez SP - 82 EP - 8 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. VL - 167 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that genetic influences act on "liability" to hysterectomy, that secular influences might differentially affect relative importance of genetic and environmental influences, and that the sources of genetic influences could be identified from reported risk factors. STUDY DESIGN: Hysterectomy data from an Australia-wide volunteer sample of female adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins are reported. In 1980 through 1982 a mailed questionnaire was completed by 1232 monozygotic female twin pairs and 751 dizygotic female twin pairs (3966 women) from the Australian Twin Register (wave 1). The same twins were surveyed by questionnaire 8 years later (wave 2). RESULTS: A total of 366 had undergone hysterectomy by wave 1 and a further 198 at wave 2. The twin-pair correlations for liability to hysterectomy at wave 1 (0.61 +/- 0.06 for monozygotic and 0.20 +/- 0.11 for dizygotic) and wave 2 (0.65 +/- 0.05 for monozygotic and 0.32 +/- 0.09 for monozygotic) indicated a substantial genetic contribution. Reported risk factors accounted for only 15% of total variance. CONCLUSION: Genetic influences on liability to hysterectomy were substantial and stable across birth cohorts, but the important sources of genetic influence on liability to hysterectomy are yet to be identified. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1442963/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9378(11)91632-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -