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Knowledge of dietary restrictions and the medical consequences of noncompliance by patients on hemodialysis are not predictive of dietary compliance.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether knowledge of the diet and medical consequences of noncompliance influences dietary compliance among patients on hemodialysis.

DESIGN

An interviewer-administered questionnaire assessed patients' knowledge of foods restricted in their diet (four separate scores for knowledge of foods restricted for: potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and fluid); overall knowledge of restricted foods (one composite knowledge score); and knowledge of medical complications of dietary noncompliance (one composite knowledge score). Patients' mean monthly serum phosphorus and potassium and weight charts provided an estimate of dietary compliance.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Seventy-one of the eligible 82 patients on hemodialysis at Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK, participated in the study (87% response rate).

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Chi(2) tests determined associations between dietary compliance and knowledge scores.

RESULTS

More than one third of patients were noncompliant with at least one dietary restriction. Phosphorus dietary restrictions were the most commonly abused and potassium the least. Patients' knowledge of the medical consequences of noncompliance was poorer than knowledge of renal dietary restrictions (mean scores 29.4%; 74.7%). There was no association between compliance with potassium or sodium/fluid restrictions and knowledge of these dietary restrictions. However, patients with better knowledge about phosphorus were less likely to be compliant (P=.03). Patients with better knowledge about the medical complications of noncompliance were less likely to be compliant for phosphorus (P=.002) and sodium/fluid (P=.008) restrictions.

APPLICATIONS

These findings question the value of current dietary education techniques in motivating patients to comply with dietary restrictions. Instead of the more traditional approach of information-giving, effective educational methods that focus on motivating patients to comply with dietary restrictions are needed to improve compliance.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    FOAD Centre, University of Southampton, School of Medicine, Princess Anne Hospital, United Kingdom.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Diet
    Drinking
    Female
    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
    Humans
    Kidney Failure, Chronic
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Patient Compliance
    Patient Education as Topic
    Phosphates
    Physician-Patient Relations
    Pilot Projects
    Potassium
    Renal Dialysis
    Sodium
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    14702581

    Citation

    Durose, Claire Louise, et al. "Knowledge of Dietary Restrictions and the Medical Consequences of Noncompliance By Patients On Hemodialysis Are Not Predictive of Dietary Compliance." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 1, 2004, pp. 35-41.
    Durose CL, Holdsworth M, Watson V, et al. Knowledge of dietary restrictions and the medical consequences of noncompliance by patients on hemodialysis are not predictive of dietary compliance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1):35-41.
    Durose, C. L., Holdsworth, M., Watson, V., & Przygrodzka, F. (2004). Knowledge of dietary restrictions and the medical consequences of noncompliance by patients on hemodialysis are not predictive of dietary compliance. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(1), pp. 35-41.
    Durose CL, et al. Knowledge of Dietary Restrictions and the Medical Consequences of Noncompliance By Patients On Hemodialysis Are Not Predictive of Dietary Compliance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(1):35-41. PubMed PMID: 14702581.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge of dietary restrictions and the medical consequences of noncompliance by patients on hemodialysis are not predictive of dietary compliance. AU - Durose,Claire Louise, AU - Holdsworth,Michelle, AU - Watson,Vicki, AU - Przygrodzka,Frances, PY - 2004/1/2/pubmed PY - 2004/2/14/medline PY - 2004/1/2/entrez SP - 35 EP - 41 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether knowledge of the diet and medical consequences of noncompliance influences dietary compliance among patients on hemodialysis. DESIGN: An interviewer-administered questionnaire assessed patients' knowledge of foods restricted in their diet (four separate scores for knowledge of foods restricted for: potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and fluid); overall knowledge of restricted foods (one composite knowledge score); and knowledge of medical complications of dietary noncompliance (one composite knowledge score). Patients' mean monthly serum phosphorus and potassium and weight charts provided an estimate of dietary compliance. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Seventy-one of the eligible 82 patients on hemodialysis at Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK, participated in the study (87% response rate). STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Chi(2) tests determined associations between dietary compliance and knowledge scores. RESULTS: More than one third of patients were noncompliant with at least one dietary restriction. Phosphorus dietary restrictions were the most commonly abused and potassium the least. Patients' knowledge of the medical consequences of noncompliance was poorer than knowledge of renal dietary restrictions (mean scores 29.4%; 74.7%). There was no association between compliance with potassium or sodium/fluid restrictions and knowledge of these dietary restrictions. However, patients with better knowledge about phosphorus were less likely to be compliant (P=.03). Patients with better knowledge about the medical complications of noncompliance were less likely to be compliant for phosphorus (P=.002) and sodium/fluid (P=.008) restrictions. APPLICATIONS: These findings question the value of current dietary education techniques in motivating patients to comply with dietary restrictions. Instead of the more traditional approach of information-giving, effective educational methods that focus on motivating patients to comply with dietary restrictions are needed to improve compliance. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14702581/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822303014470 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -