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Preventing visual loss from chronic eye disease in primary care: scientific review.
JAMA 2004; 291(12):1487-95JAMA

Abstract

CONTEXT

Vision loss is common in the United States and its prevalence increases with age. Visual disability significantly impacts quality of life and increases the risk of injury. Although at least 40% of blindness in the United States is either preventable or treatable with timely diagnosis and intervention, many people with vision loss are undiagnosed and untreated.

OBJECTIVE

To review the evidence regarding screening and management of eye disorders and visual disability among adults in the primary care setting.

DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION

MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse were searched for articles and practice guidelines about screening and management of eye diseases and vision loss among adults in the primary care setting using key words and free-text terms, such as vision screening, glaucoma prevention and control, from 1985 to 2003. References in these articles and those suggested by experts in eye care, vision loss, and vision screening were reviewed as well.

DATA EXTRACTION

Articles were searched for the most clinically important information and emphasized randomized controlled trials where available.

DATA SYNTHESIS

Most major guidelines recommend periodic referral of older adults to an eye care professional for comprehensive evaluation to detect eye diseases and visual disability. The value of routine screening for vision loss in the primary care setting has not been established. Timely identification and treatment of eye diseases can substantially reduce the incidence and prevalence of visual disability among older adults. Optimizing management of systemic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, significantly reduces the risk of related eye disorders.

CONCLUSIONS

Primary care clinicians can play a vital role in preserving vision in their patients by managing systemic diseases that impact eye health and by ensuring that patients undergo periodic evaluations by eye care professionals and receive needed eye care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass 02119, USA. srowe@bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15039416

Citation

Rowe, Susannah, et al. "Preventing Visual Loss From Chronic Eye Disease in Primary Care: Scientific Review." JAMA, vol. 291, no. 12, 2004, pp. 1487-95.
Rowe S, MacLean CH, Shekelle PG. Preventing visual loss from chronic eye disease in primary care: scientific review. JAMA. 2004;291(12):1487-95.
Rowe, S., MacLean, C. H., & Shekelle, P. G. (2004). Preventing visual loss from chronic eye disease in primary care: scientific review. JAMA, 291(12), pp. 1487-95.
Rowe S, MacLean CH, Shekelle PG. Preventing Visual Loss From Chronic Eye Disease in Primary Care: Scientific Review. JAMA. 2004 Mar 24;291(12):1487-95. PubMed PMID: 15039416.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preventing visual loss from chronic eye disease in primary care: scientific review. AU - Rowe,Susannah, AU - MacLean,Catherine H, AU - Shekelle,Paul G, PY - 2004/3/25/pubmed PY - 2004/3/27/medline PY - 2004/3/25/entrez SP - 1487 EP - 95 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 291 IS - 12 N2 - CONTEXT: Vision loss is common in the United States and its prevalence increases with age. Visual disability significantly impacts quality of life and increases the risk of injury. Although at least 40% of blindness in the United States is either preventable or treatable with timely diagnosis and intervention, many people with vision loss are undiagnosed and untreated. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence regarding screening and management of eye disorders and visual disability among adults in the primary care setting. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse were searched for articles and practice guidelines about screening and management of eye diseases and vision loss among adults in the primary care setting using key words and free-text terms, such as vision screening, glaucoma prevention and control, from 1985 to 2003. References in these articles and those suggested by experts in eye care, vision loss, and vision screening were reviewed as well. DATA EXTRACTION: Articles were searched for the most clinically important information and emphasized randomized controlled trials where available. DATA SYNTHESIS: Most major guidelines recommend periodic referral of older adults to an eye care professional for comprehensive evaluation to detect eye diseases and visual disability. The value of routine screening for vision loss in the primary care setting has not been established. Timely identification and treatment of eye diseases can substantially reduce the incidence and prevalence of visual disability among older adults. Optimizing management of systemic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, significantly reduces the risk of related eye disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care clinicians can play a vital role in preserving vision in their patients by managing systemic diseases that impact eye health and by ensuring that patients undergo periodic evaluations by eye care professionals and receive needed eye care. SN - 1538-3598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15039416/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.291.12.1487 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -