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Comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome, panic disorder, and agoraphobia in a Japanese representative sample.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is considered to be a transcultural functional bowel disorder with high comorbidity and psychiatric disorders; but well-designed epidemiologic studies have never been performed in Japan. The purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of IBS, together with the comorbidity rates of panic disorder (PD) and agoraphobia, employing a large-scale survey based on stratified random sampling.

METHODS

A total of 4,000 subjects aged 20-69 years completed a questionnaire and the results were weighted to ensure representativeness of the Japanese general population. The questionnaire covered key symptoms of IBS, PD, and agoraphobia. The prevalence of IBS and its subtypes was calculated by gender. The comorbidity of PD and agoraphobia with IBS was compared with morbidity in non-IBS subjects; and comorbidity in IBS subjects who had consulted medical practitioners regarding their symptoms and in those who had not was also compared.

RESULTS

The prevalence of IBS was 6.1% in total. It was significantly higher in females than in males. Diarrhea-predominant IBS was more prevalent in males and constipation-predominant IBS in females. The morbidity rates of PD and agoraphobia were significantly higher in IBS than in non-IBS subjects. Comorbidity did not differ between female and male IBS subjects, while morbidity was significantly higher in female than in male non-IBS subjects; and comorbidity did not differ between consulter and nonconsulter subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of IBS and its comorbidity with PD and agoraphobia in Japan were demonstrated to be similar to those reported in Western industrialized countries.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Agoraphobia
    Comorbidity
    Female
    Humans
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Japan
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Panic Disorder
    Prevalence
    Sex Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15046231

    Citation

    Kumano, Hiroaki, et al. "Comorbidity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Panic Disorder, and Agoraphobia in a Japanese Representative Sample." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 99, no. 2, 2004, pp. 370-6.
    Kumano H, Kaiya H, Yoshiuchi K, et al. Comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome, panic disorder, and agoraphobia in a Japanese representative sample. Am J Gastroenterol. 2004;99(2):370-6.
    Kumano, H., Kaiya, H., Yoshiuchi, K., Yamanaka, G., Sasaki, T., & Kuboki, T. (2004). Comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome, panic disorder, and agoraphobia in a Japanese representative sample. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 99(2), pp. 370-6.
    Kumano H, et al. Comorbidity of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Panic Disorder, and Agoraphobia in a Japanese Representative Sample. Am J Gastroenterol. 2004;99(2):370-6. PubMed PMID: 15046231.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome, panic disorder, and agoraphobia in a Japanese representative sample. AU - Kumano,Hiroaki, AU - Kaiya,Hisanobu, AU - Yoshiuchi,Kazuhiro, AU - Yamanaka,Gaku, AU - Sasaki,Tadashi, AU - Kuboki,Tomifusa, PY - 2004/3/30/pubmed PY - 2004/5/7/medline PY - 2004/3/30/entrez SP - 370 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 99 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is considered to be a transcultural functional bowel disorder with high comorbidity and psychiatric disorders; but well-designed epidemiologic studies have never been performed in Japan. The purpose of this study was to establish the prevalence of IBS, together with the comorbidity rates of panic disorder (PD) and agoraphobia, employing a large-scale survey based on stratified random sampling. METHODS: A total of 4,000 subjects aged 20-69 years completed a questionnaire and the results were weighted to ensure representativeness of the Japanese general population. The questionnaire covered key symptoms of IBS, PD, and agoraphobia. The prevalence of IBS and its subtypes was calculated by gender. The comorbidity of PD and agoraphobia with IBS was compared with morbidity in non-IBS subjects; and comorbidity in IBS subjects who had consulted medical practitioners regarding their symptoms and in those who had not was also compared. RESULTS: The prevalence of IBS was 6.1% in total. It was significantly higher in females than in males. Diarrhea-predominant IBS was more prevalent in males and constipation-predominant IBS in females. The morbidity rates of PD and agoraphobia were significantly higher in IBS than in non-IBS subjects. Comorbidity did not differ between female and male IBS subjects, while morbidity was significantly higher in female than in male non-IBS subjects; and comorbidity did not differ between consulter and nonconsulter subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of IBS and its comorbidity with PD and agoraphobia in Japan were demonstrated to be similar to those reported in Western industrialized countries. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15046231/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15046231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -