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Nutritional supplements as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis: pilot research.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Inflammation and edema of the sinonasal mucosa are important in the pathophysiology of sinusitis. Based on the similarities between otitis media (OM) and sinusitis, and our previous research on OM, we hypothesized that nutritional supplements would be effective adjunctive therapy for the treatment of children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis.

METHODS

We performed a 4 month, open-label, dose-titration study; subjects were enrolled from late January to early March 2003. Each subject served as his own control. Study supplements were a lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a children's multivitamin-mineral with selenium, prescribed in escalating doses; at higher doses, fish oil was substituted for cod liver oil. Subjects were private pediatric otolaryngology outpatients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic/recurrent sinusitis, whose symptoms were refractory to treatment with antibiotics.

RESULTS

Our four subjects were Caucasian males, ranging in age from 4.2 to 9.8 years, with chronic/recurrent sinusitis for at least 3 years prior to entry in the study. Three subjects had a positive response; one subject dropped out for administrative reasons. Four, six, and eight weeks after beginning study supplements, the responders had decreased sinus symptoms, fewer episodes of acute sinusitis, and fewer doctor visits for acute illnesses. Their parents reported that they had begun to recover from upper respiratory illnesses without complications, which was unusual for these children, as was improvement in springtime; their improvement had previously been limited to the summer months or periods of home-schooling.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of flavored cod liver oil and a multivitamin-mineral with selenium as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis is an inexpensive, non-invasive intervention that clinicians can use for selected patients, pending the performance of definitive, large, well-controlled studies.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Otolaryngology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, NY, USA. lal14@columbia.edu

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Chronic Disease
    Cod Liver Oil
    Dietary Supplements
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Humans
    Male
    Recurrence
    Selenium
    Sinusitis
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin D
    Vitamins

    Pub Type(s)

    Case Reports
    Clinical Trial
    Controlled Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15126020

    Citation

    Linday, Linda A., et al. "Nutritional Supplements as Adjunctive Therapy for Children With Chronic/recurrent Sinusitis: Pilot Research." International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 68, no. 6, 2004, pp. 785-93.
    Linday LA, Dolitsky JN, Shindledecker RD. Nutritional supplements as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis: pilot research. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004;68(6):785-93.
    Linday, L. A., Dolitsky, J. N., & Shindledecker, R. D. (2004). Nutritional supplements as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis: pilot research. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 68(6), pp. 785-93.
    Linday LA, Dolitsky JN, Shindledecker RD. Nutritional Supplements as Adjunctive Therapy for Children With Chronic/recurrent Sinusitis: Pilot Research. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004;68(6):785-93. PubMed PMID: 15126020.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional supplements as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis: pilot research. AU - Linday,Linda A, AU - Dolitsky,Jay N, AU - Shindledecker,Richard D, PY - 2003/10/29/received PY - 2004/01/12/accepted PY - 2004/5/6/pubmed PY - 2004/10/13/medline PY - 2004/5/6/entrez SP - 785 EP - 93 JF - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology JO - Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol. VL - 68 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Inflammation and edema of the sinonasal mucosa are important in the pathophysiology of sinusitis. Based on the similarities between otitis media (OM) and sinusitis, and our previous research on OM, we hypothesized that nutritional supplements would be effective adjunctive therapy for the treatment of children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis. METHODS: We performed a 4 month, open-label, dose-titration study; subjects were enrolled from late January to early March 2003. Each subject served as his own control. Study supplements were a lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a children's multivitamin-mineral with selenium, prescribed in escalating doses; at higher doses, fish oil was substituted for cod liver oil. Subjects were private pediatric otolaryngology outpatients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic/recurrent sinusitis, whose symptoms were refractory to treatment with antibiotics. RESULTS: Our four subjects were Caucasian males, ranging in age from 4.2 to 9.8 years, with chronic/recurrent sinusitis for at least 3 years prior to entry in the study. Three subjects had a positive response; one subject dropped out for administrative reasons. Four, six, and eight weeks after beginning study supplements, the responders had decreased sinus symptoms, fewer episodes of acute sinusitis, and fewer doctor visits for acute illnesses. Their parents reported that they had begun to recover from upper respiratory illnesses without complications, which was unusual for these children, as was improvement in springtime; their improvement had previously been limited to the summer months or periods of home-schooling. CONCLUSIONS: Use of flavored cod liver oil and a multivitamin-mineral with selenium as adjunctive therapy for children with chronic/recurrent sinusitis is an inexpensive, non-invasive intervention that clinicians can use for selected patients, pending the performance of definitive, large, well-controlled studies. SN - 0165-5876 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15126020/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165587604000126 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -