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Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: what the primary care physician should know.
Obstet Gynecol Surv 2004; 59(7):537-42OG

Abstract

In recent years, testing for cancer susceptibility genes has entered the clinical setting. The practicing physician needs to be familiar with this evolving area of medicine to be able to counsel and/or refer high-risk patients such as those with a strong personal or family history of cancer. The following is a review of the clinically pertinent information regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancers resulting from mutations in BRCA genes. A special emphasis is placed on the different options available for BRCA mutation carriers, because many interventions have already proven to be highly efficacious. The increased risk of cancer seen in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is not part of this review but is mentioned briefly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. fcollado@lmcmc.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15199272

Citation

Khoury-Collado, Fady, and Allan T. Bombard. "Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer: what the Primary Care Physician Should Know." Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, vol. 59, no. 7, 2004, pp. 537-42.
Khoury-Collado F, Bombard AT. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: what the primary care physician should know. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2004;59(7):537-42.
Khoury-Collado, F., & Bombard, A. T. (2004). Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: what the primary care physician should know. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, 59(7), pp. 537-42.
Khoury-Collado F, Bombard AT. Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer: what the Primary Care Physician Should Know. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2004;59(7):537-42. PubMed PMID: 15199272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: what the primary care physician should know. AU - Khoury-Collado,Fady, AU - Bombard,Allan T, PY - 2004/6/17/pubmed PY - 2004/9/24/medline PY - 2004/6/17/entrez SP - 537 EP - 42 JF - Obstetrical & gynecological survey JO - Obstet Gynecol Surv VL - 59 IS - 7 N2 - In recent years, testing for cancer susceptibility genes has entered the clinical setting. The practicing physician needs to be familiar with this evolving area of medicine to be able to counsel and/or refer high-risk patients such as those with a strong personal or family history of cancer. The following is a review of the clinically pertinent information regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancers resulting from mutations in BRCA genes. A special emphasis is placed on the different options available for BRCA mutation carriers, because many interventions have already proven to be highly efficacious. The increased risk of cancer seen in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is not part of this review but is mentioned briefly. SN - 0029-7828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15199272/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15199272.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -