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Risk of uterine leiomyomata in relation to tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption in the Black Women's Health Study.
Hum Reprod 2004; 19(8):1746-54HR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption may influence risk of uterine leiomyomata via changes in ovarian function or hormone metabolism.

METHODS

We prospectively assessed the relation of these exposures to risk of self-reported uterine leiomyomata in the Black Women's Health Study. From 1997 to 2001, we followed 21,885 premenopausal women with intact uteri and no prior myoma diagnosis. Cox regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

During 73,426 person-years of follow-up, 2177 incident cases of uterine leiomyomata confirmed by ultrasound (n = 1920) or hysterectomy (n = 257) were reported. Cigarette smoking was not associated with risk of uterine leiomyomata. Risk was positively associated with years of alcohol consumption and current consumption of alcohol, particularly beer. Relative to non-drinkers, multivariate IRRs for beer consumption of < 1, 1-6 and 7+ drinks/week were 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.27), 1.18 (95% CI 1.00-1.40) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.17-2.11), respectively. Heavy coffee and caffeine consumption were not associated with risk overall, but IRRs were increased among women aged < 35 years.

CONCLUSIONS

In US black women, risk of uterine leiomyomata was positively associated with current consumption of alcohol, particularly beer. Cigarette smoking and caffeine consumption were unrelated to risk overall.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. lwise@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15218005

Citation

Wise, Lauren A., et al. "Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata in Relation to Tobacco, Alcohol and Caffeine Consumption in the Black Women's Health Study." Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), vol. 19, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1746-54.
Wise LA, Palmer JR, Harlow BL, et al. Risk of uterine leiomyomata in relation to tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption in the Black Women's Health Study. Hum Reprod. 2004;19(8):1746-54.
Wise, L. A., Palmer, J. R., Harlow, B. L., Spiegelman, D., Stewart, E. A., Adams-Campbell, L. L., & Rosenberg, L. (2004). Risk of uterine leiomyomata in relation to tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption in the Black Women's Health Study. Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), 19(8), pp. 1746-54.
Wise LA, et al. Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata in Relation to Tobacco, Alcohol and Caffeine Consumption in the Black Women's Health Study. Hum Reprod. 2004;19(8):1746-54. PubMed PMID: 15218005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of uterine leiomyomata in relation to tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption in the Black Women's Health Study. AU - Wise,Lauren A, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Harlow,Bernard L, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Stewart,Elizabeth A, AU - Adams-Campbell,Lucile L, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, Y1 - 2004/06/24/ PY - 2004/6/26/pubmed PY - 2005/1/28/medline PY - 2004/6/26/entrez SP - 1746 EP - 54 JF - Human reproduction (Oxford, England) JO - Hum. Reprod. VL - 19 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tobacco, alcohol and caffeine consumption may influence risk of uterine leiomyomata via changes in ovarian function or hormone metabolism. METHODS: We prospectively assessed the relation of these exposures to risk of self-reported uterine leiomyomata in the Black Women's Health Study. From 1997 to 2001, we followed 21,885 premenopausal women with intact uteri and no prior myoma diagnosis. Cox regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: During 73,426 person-years of follow-up, 2177 incident cases of uterine leiomyomata confirmed by ultrasound (n = 1920) or hysterectomy (n = 257) were reported. Cigarette smoking was not associated with risk of uterine leiomyomata. Risk was positively associated with years of alcohol consumption and current consumption of alcohol, particularly beer. Relative to non-drinkers, multivariate IRRs for beer consumption of < 1, 1-6 and 7+ drinks/week were 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.27), 1.18 (95% CI 1.00-1.40) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.17-2.11), respectively. Heavy coffee and caffeine consumption were not associated with risk overall, but IRRs were increased among women aged < 35 years. CONCLUSIONS: In US black women, risk of uterine leiomyomata was positively associated with current consumption of alcohol, particularly beer. Cigarette smoking and caffeine consumption were unrelated to risk overall. SN - 0268-1161 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15218005/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/humrep/deh309 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -