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Maternal dietary risk factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (United States).
Cancer Causes Control 2004; 15(6):559-70CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, and the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-14 years. Recent research has established that the disease can originate in utero, and thus maternal diet may be an important risk factor for ALL.

METHODS

The Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study is a population-based case-control study of risk factors for childhood leukemia, including maternal diet. Cases (n = 138) and controls (n = 138) were matched on sex, date of birth, mother's race, Hispanicity, and county of residence at birth. Maternal dietary intake in the 12 months prior to pregnancy was obtained by a 76-item food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

Consumption of the vegetables (OR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33-0.85; p = 0.008), protein sources (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.18-0.90, p = 0.03), and fruits (OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.49-1.04; p = 0.08) food groups were inversely associated with ALL. Among nutrients, consumption of provitamin A carotenoids (OR = 0.65, 95% CI, 0.42-1.01; p = 0.05), and the antioxidant glutathione (OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.16-1.10; p = 0.08) were inversely associated with ALL.

CONCLUSION

Maternal dietary factors, specifically the consumption of vegetables, fruits, protein sources and related nutrients, may play a role in the etiology of ALL. Dietary carotenoids and glutathione appear to be important contributors to this effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, 419 Warren Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7360, USA. cjensen@berkeley.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15280635

Citation

Jensen, Christopher D., et al. "Maternal Dietary Risk Factors in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (United States)." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 15, no. 6, 2004, pp. 559-70.
Jensen CD, Block G, Buffler P, et al. Maternal dietary risk factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2004;15(6):559-70.
Jensen, C. D., Block, G., Buffler, P., Ma, X., Selvin, S., & Month, S. (2004). Maternal dietary risk factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (United States). Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 15(6), pp. 559-70.
Jensen CD, et al. Maternal Dietary Risk Factors in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2004;15(6):559-70. PubMed PMID: 15280635.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal dietary risk factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (United States). AU - Jensen,Christopher D, AU - Block,Gladys, AU - Buffler,Patricia, AU - Ma,Xiaomei, AU - Selvin,Steve, AU - Month,Stacy, PY - 2004/7/29/pubmed PY - 2004/11/17/medline PY - 2004/7/29/entrez SP - 559 EP - 70 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 15 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, and the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-14 years. Recent research has established that the disease can originate in utero, and thus maternal diet may be an important risk factor for ALL. METHODS: The Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study is a population-based case-control study of risk factors for childhood leukemia, including maternal diet. Cases (n = 138) and controls (n = 138) were matched on sex, date of birth, mother's race, Hispanicity, and county of residence at birth. Maternal dietary intake in the 12 months prior to pregnancy was obtained by a 76-item food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Consumption of the vegetables (OR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33-0.85; p = 0.008), protein sources (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.18-0.90, p = 0.03), and fruits (OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.49-1.04; p = 0.08) food groups were inversely associated with ALL. Among nutrients, consumption of provitamin A carotenoids (OR = 0.65, 95% CI, 0.42-1.01; p = 0.05), and the antioxidant glutathione (OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.16-1.10; p = 0.08) were inversely associated with ALL. CONCLUSION: Maternal dietary factors, specifically the consumption of vegetables, fruits, protein sources and related nutrients, may play a role in the etiology of ALL. Dietary carotenoids and glutathione appear to be important contributors to this effect. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15280635/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15280635.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -