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Diet and physical activity counseling during ambulatory care visits in the United States.
Prev Med 2004; 39(4):815-22PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Research is limited regarding national patterns of behavioral counseling during ambulatory care. We examined time trends and independent correlates of diet and physical activity counseling for American adults with an elevated cardiovascular risk during their outpatient visits.

METHODS

The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) provided 1992-2000 national estimates of counseling practices in private physician offices and hospital outpatient departments.

RESULTS

Rates of diet and physical activity counseling among visits by at-risk adults exhibited a modest ascending trend from 1992 to 2000, with the biggest growth found between 1996 and 1997. Throughout the 1990s, however, diet counseling was provided in <45% and physical activity counseling in < or = 30% of visits by adults with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, or diabetes mellitus. Lower likelihood of either counseling was significantly associated with patients who were > or = 75 years of age, seen by generalists, and those with fewer risk factors. Also, diet counseling was less frequently provided during visits by whites vs. ethnic minorities and by men vs. women.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite available national guidelines, diet and physical activity counseling remain below expectations during outpatient visits by adults with an elevated cardiovascular risk. Given recent trends, immediate, satisfactory improvement is unlikely without future innovative interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program of Prevention Outcomes and Practices, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, CA 94305-5705, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15351551

Citation

Ma, Jun, et al. "Diet and Physical Activity Counseling During Ambulatory Care Visits in the United States." Preventive Medicine, vol. 39, no. 4, 2004, pp. 815-22.
Ma J, Urizar GG, Alehegn T, et al. Diet and physical activity counseling during ambulatory care visits in the United States. Prev Med. 2004;39(4):815-22.
Ma, J., Urizar, G. G., Alehegn, T., & Stafford, R. S. (2004). Diet and physical activity counseling during ambulatory care visits in the United States. Preventive Medicine, 39(4), pp. 815-22.
Ma J, et al. Diet and Physical Activity Counseling During Ambulatory Care Visits in the United States. Prev Med. 2004;39(4):815-22. PubMed PMID: 15351551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and physical activity counseling during ambulatory care visits in the United States. AU - Ma,Jun, AU - Urizar,Guido G,Jr AU - Alehegn,Tseday, AU - Stafford,Randall S, PY - 2004/9/8/pubmed PY - 2005/4/19/medline PY - 2004/9/8/entrez SP - 815 EP - 22 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 39 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Research is limited regarding national patterns of behavioral counseling during ambulatory care. We examined time trends and independent correlates of diet and physical activity counseling for American adults with an elevated cardiovascular risk during their outpatient visits. METHODS: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) provided 1992-2000 national estimates of counseling practices in private physician offices and hospital outpatient departments. RESULTS: Rates of diet and physical activity counseling among visits by at-risk adults exhibited a modest ascending trend from 1992 to 2000, with the biggest growth found between 1996 and 1997. Throughout the 1990s, however, diet counseling was provided in <45% and physical activity counseling in < or = 30% of visits by adults with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, or diabetes mellitus. Lower likelihood of either counseling was significantly associated with patients who were > or = 75 years of age, seen by generalists, and those with fewer risk factors. Also, diet counseling was less frequently provided during visits by whites vs. ethnic minorities and by men vs. women. CONCLUSIONS: Despite available national guidelines, diet and physical activity counseling remain below expectations during outpatient visits by adults with an elevated cardiovascular risk. Given recent trends, immediate, satisfactory improvement is unlikely without future innovative interventions. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15351551/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091743504001641 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -