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Oxidative stress in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: pathogenesis and antioxidant therapies.

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease, a common finding on liver biopsy in those patients with abnormal blood transaminase levels, and a common cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis in the United States. The prevalence of this disorder is expected to rise with the increase in obesity, and the clinical spectrum can range from simple steatosis (fatty liver) to cirrhosis of the liver. Insulin resistance is thought to be pivotal for the development of steatosis, and oxidative stress may be a potential factor that can promote hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis. Preliminary studies have examined the role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in animal and human studies of this disorder. Efforts to improve the hepatic antioxidant system could be achieved by optimizing the patient's diet, by supplementation with precursors for antioxidants, or by supplementation with essential metals and/or antioxidants. Randomized, controlled trials are required to examine these potential approaches using patients with this disorder.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Antioxidants
    Chronic Disease
    Disease Models, Animal
    Fatty Liver
    Humans
    Oxidative Stress

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15682682

    Citation

    Gawrieh, Samer, et al. "Oxidative Stress in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Antioxidant Therapies." Journal of Investigative Medicine : the Official Publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research, vol. 52, no. 8, 2004, pp. 506-14.
    Gawrieh S, Opara EC, Koch TR. Oxidative stress in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: pathogenesis and antioxidant therapies. J Investig Med. 2004;52(8):506-14.
    Gawrieh, S., Opara, E. C., & Koch, T. R. (2004). Oxidative stress in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: pathogenesis and antioxidant therapies. Journal of Investigative Medicine : the Official Publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research, 52(8), pp. 506-14. doi:10.1136/jim-52-08-22.
    Gawrieh S, Opara EC, Koch TR. Oxidative Stress in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Antioxidant Therapies. J Investig Med. 2004;52(8):506-14. PubMed PMID: 15682682.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Oxidative stress in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: pathogenesis and antioxidant therapies. AU - Gawrieh,Samer, AU - Opara,Emmanuel C, AU - Koch,Timothy R, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/2/18/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 506 EP - 14 JF - Journal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research JO - J. Investig. Med. VL - 52 IS - 8 N2 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease, a common finding on liver biopsy in those patients with abnormal blood transaminase levels, and a common cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis in the United States. The prevalence of this disorder is expected to rise with the increase in obesity, and the clinical spectrum can range from simple steatosis (fatty liver) to cirrhosis of the liver. Insulin resistance is thought to be pivotal for the development of steatosis, and oxidative stress may be a potential factor that can promote hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis. Preliminary studies have examined the role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in animal and human studies of this disorder. Efforts to improve the hepatic antioxidant system could be achieved by optimizing the patient's diet, by supplementation with precursors for antioxidants, or by supplementation with essential metals and/or antioxidants. Randomized, controlled trials are required to examine these potential approaches using patients with this disorder. SN - 1081-5589 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15682682/full_citation L2 - http://jim.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15682682 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -