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The dearth of psychological treatment studies for anorexia nervosa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Anorexia nervosa (AN) was first described more than 130 years ago, yet few psychological treatments have been formally studied. Our objective was to review the available studies to understand whether these may highlight directions for future investigation.

METHOD

Medline and PsycINFO were consulted to identify relevant treatment studies. Twenty psychotherapy treatment studies were identified for review. These were divided in terms of patient age (adolescent vs. adult) and type of study (uncontrolled vs. controlled).

RESULTS

Without exception, adolescent studies (uncontrolled or controlled) involved the parents or family in the treatment. The adult studies were much more varied in terms of treatments that were compared. Most studies were statistically underpowered and only one utilized manualized treatments. More recent investigations have attempted to remedy these methodologic shortcomings.

DISCUSSION

The review highlights the effectiveness of one particular treatment modality for adolescents, but emphasizes the compelling need for further and larger systematic investigation into treatments for both adolescent and adult AN.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, The University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. dlegrang@uchicago.edu

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Anorexia Nervosa
    Female
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Psychotherapy

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15732072

    Citation

    le Grange, Daniel, and James Lock. "The Dearth of Psychological Treatment Studies for Anorexia Nervosa." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 37, no. 2, 2005, pp. 79-91.
    le Grange D, Lock J. The dearth of psychological treatment studies for anorexia nervosa. Int J Eat Disord. 2005;37(2):79-91.
    le Grange, D., & Lock, J. (2005). The dearth of psychological treatment studies for anorexia nervosa. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 37(2), pp. 79-91.
    le Grange D, Lock J. The Dearth of Psychological Treatment Studies for Anorexia Nervosa. Int J Eat Disord. 2005;37(2):79-91. PubMed PMID: 15732072.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The dearth of psychological treatment studies for anorexia nervosa. AU - le Grange,Daniel, AU - Lock,James, PY - 2005/2/26/pubmed PY - 2005/6/15/medline PY - 2005/2/26/entrez SP - 79 EP - 91 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Anorexia nervosa (AN) was first described more than 130 years ago, yet few psychological treatments have been formally studied. Our objective was to review the available studies to understand whether these may highlight directions for future investigation. METHOD: Medline and PsycINFO were consulted to identify relevant treatment studies. Twenty psychotherapy treatment studies were identified for review. These were divided in terms of patient age (adolescent vs. adult) and type of study (uncontrolled vs. controlled). RESULTS: Without exception, adolescent studies (uncontrolled or controlled) involved the parents or family in the treatment. The adult studies were much more varied in terms of treatments that were compared. Most studies were statistically underpowered and only one utilized manualized treatments. More recent investigations have attempted to remedy these methodologic shortcomings. DISCUSSION: The review highlights the effectiveness of one particular treatment modality for adolescents, but emphasizes the compelling need for further and larger systematic investigation into treatments for both adolescent and adult AN. SN - 0276-3478 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15732072/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20085 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -