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Long-term intake of trans-fatty acids and risk of gallstone disease in men.
Arch Intern Med 2005; 165(9):1011-5AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The consumption of trans-fatty acids adversely affects blood lipid levels. The relationship with the incidence of gallstone disease is unknown.

METHODS

We prospectively studied consumption of trans-fatty acids in relation to the risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 45,912 men. trans-Fatty acid consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease, by radiology or cholecystectomy, was ascertained biennially.

RESULTS

During 14 years of follow-up, we documented 2356 new cases of symptomatic gallstones. After adjusting for age and other potential risk factors, we found that compared with men in the lowest quintile of dietary intake of trans-fatty acids, the relative risk (RR) of gallstone disease for those in the highest quintile was 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.44; P for trend, .03). Among individual trans-fatty acids, the RR for trans-oleic fatty acid, when extreme quintiles were compared, was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.06-1.45; P for trend, .02). Intakes of trans-palmitoleic fatty acid (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.90-1.31), trans,trans 18:2 fatty acid (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.96-1.34), and cis-trans 18:2 fatty acid (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86-1.16) were not significantly associated with the risk.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that a higher intake of trans-fatty acids modestly increases risk of gallstone disease. This adds to the concern that partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils to form shortening and margarine can lead to adverse health effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536-0298, USA. hpcjt@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15883239

Citation

Tsai, Chung-Jyi, et al. "Long-term Intake of Trans-fatty Acids and Risk of Gallstone Disease in Men." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1011-5.
Tsai CJ, Leitzmann MF, Willett WC, et al. Long-term intake of trans-fatty acids and risk of gallstone disease in men. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(9):1011-5.
Tsai, C. J., Leitzmann, M. F., Willett, W. C., & Giovannucci, E. L. (2005). Long-term intake of trans-fatty acids and risk of gallstone disease in men. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(9), pp. 1011-5.
Tsai CJ, et al. Long-term Intake of Trans-fatty Acids and Risk of Gallstone Disease in Men. Arch Intern Med. 2005 May 9;165(9):1011-5. PubMed PMID: 15883239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term intake of trans-fatty acids and risk of gallstone disease in men. AU - Tsai,Chung-Jyi, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, PY - 2005/5/11/pubmed PY - 2005/6/9/medline PY - 2005/5/11/entrez SP - 1011 EP - 5 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 165 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: The consumption of trans-fatty acids adversely affects blood lipid levels. The relationship with the incidence of gallstone disease is unknown. METHODS: We prospectively studied consumption of trans-fatty acids in relation to the risk of gallstone disease in a cohort of 45,912 men. trans-Fatty acid consumption was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Newly diagnosed gallstone disease, by radiology or cholecystectomy, was ascertained biennially. RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, we documented 2356 new cases of symptomatic gallstones. After adjusting for age and other potential risk factors, we found that compared with men in the lowest quintile of dietary intake of trans-fatty acids, the relative risk (RR) of gallstone disease for those in the highest quintile was 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.44; P for trend, .03). Among individual trans-fatty acids, the RR for trans-oleic fatty acid, when extreme quintiles were compared, was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.06-1.45; P for trend, .02). Intakes of trans-palmitoleic fatty acid (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.90-1.31), trans,trans 18:2 fatty acid (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.96-1.34), and cis-trans 18:2 fatty acid (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86-1.16) were not significantly associated with the risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a higher intake of trans-fatty acids modestly increases risk of gallstone disease. This adds to the concern that partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils to form shortening and margarine can lead to adverse health effects. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15883239/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.9.1011 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -