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Diet and psoriasis: experimental data and clinical evidence.

Abstract

Psoriasis is considered as a T-cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease which is characterized by hyperproliferation and poor differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. While susceptibility to psoriasis is inherited, the disease is influenced by environmental factors such as infections and stress. Diet has been suggested to play a role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Fasting periods, low-energy diets and vegetarian diets improved psoriasis symptoms in some studies, and diets rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oil also showed beneficial effects. All these diets modify the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and influence the eicosanoid profile, so that inflammatory processes are suppressed. Some patients with psoriasis show an elevated sensitivity to gluten. In patients with IgA and/or IgG antigliadin antibodies the symptoms have been shown to improve on a gluten-free diet. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), exhibits antiproliferative and immunoregulatory effects via the vitamin D receptor, and thus is successfully used in the topical treatment of psoriasis. In this review, dietary factors which play a role in psoriasis are assessed and their potential benefit is evaluated. Furthermore, the risk of drug-nutrient interactions in psoriasis therapy is discussed.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Nutrition Physiology and Human Nutrition Unit, Institute of Food Science, University of Hannover, Wunstorfer Strasse 14, D-30453 Hannover, Germany. maike.wolters@lw.uni-hannover.de

    Source

    The British journal of dermatology 153:4 2005 Oct pg 706-14

    MeSH

    Antioxidants
    Cholecalciferol
    Diet
    Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
    Food-Drug Interactions
    Glutens
    Humans
    Oxidative Stress
    Psoriasis
    Vitamin B 12

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16181450

    Citation

    Wolters, M. "Diet and Psoriasis: Experimental Data and Clinical Evidence." The British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 153, no. 4, 2005, pp. 706-14.
    Wolters M. Diet and psoriasis: experimental data and clinical evidence. Br J Dermatol. 2005;153(4):706-14.
    Wolters, M. (2005). Diet and psoriasis: experimental data and clinical evidence. The British Journal of Dermatology, 153(4), pp. 706-14.
    Wolters M. Diet and Psoriasis: Experimental Data and Clinical Evidence. Br J Dermatol. 2005;153(4):706-14. PubMed PMID: 16181450.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and psoriasis: experimental data and clinical evidence. A1 - Wolters,M, PY - 2005/9/27/pubmed PY - 2006/1/13/medline PY - 2005/9/27/entrez SP - 706 EP - 14 JF - The British journal of dermatology JO - Br. J. Dermatol. VL - 153 IS - 4 N2 - Psoriasis is considered as a T-cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease which is characterized by hyperproliferation and poor differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. While susceptibility to psoriasis is inherited, the disease is influenced by environmental factors such as infections and stress. Diet has been suggested to play a role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Fasting periods, low-energy diets and vegetarian diets improved psoriasis symptoms in some studies, and diets rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oil also showed beneficial effects. All these diets modify the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and influence the eicosanoid profile, so that inflammatory processes are suppressed. Some patients with psoriasis show an elevated sensitivity to gluten. In patients with IgA and/or IgG antigliadin antibodies the symptoms have been shown to improve on a gluten-free diet. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), exhibits antiproliferative and immunoregulatory effects via the vitamin D receptor, and thus is successfully used in the topical treatment of psoriasis. In this review, dietary factors which play a role in psoriasis are assessed and their potential benefit is evaluated. Furthermore, the risk of drug-nutrient interactions in psoriasis therapy is discussed. SN - 0007-0963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16181450/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2005.06781.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -