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The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: a review of meta-analyses.

Abstract

This review summarizes the current meta-analysis literature on treatment outcomes of CBT for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. A search of the literature resulted in a total of 16 methodologically rigorous meta-analyses. Our review focuses on effect sizes that contrast outcomes for CBT with outcomes for various control groups for each disorder, which provides an overview of the effectiveness of cognitive therapy as quantified by meta-analysis. Large effect sizes were found for CBT for unipolar depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and childhood depressive and anxiety disorders. Effect sizes for CBT of marital distress, anger, childhood somatic disorders, and chronic pain were in the moderate range. CBT was somewhat superior to antidepressants in the treatment of adult depression. CBT was equally effective as behavior therapy in the treatment of adult depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Large uncontrolled effect sizes were found for bulimia nervosa and schizophrenia. The 16 meta-analyses we reviewed support the efficacy of CBT for many disorders. While limitations of the meta-analytic approach need to be considered in interpreting the results of this review, our findings are consistent with other review methodologies that also provide support for the efficacy CBT.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Pennsylvania and Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research, USA. drandybutler@yahoo.com

    , ,

    Source

    Clinical psychology review 26:1 2006 Jan pg 17-31

    MeSH

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Empirical Research
    Humans
    Mental Disorders
    Meta-Analysis as Topic

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16199119

    Citation

    Butler, Andrew C., et al. "The Empirical Status of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy: a Review of Meta-analyses." Clinical Psychology Review, vol. 26, no. 1, 2006, pp. 17-31.
    Butler AC, Chapman JE, Forman EM, et al. The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: a review of meta-analyses. Clin Psychol Rev. 2006;26(1):17-31.
    Butler, A. C., Chapman, J. E., Forman, E. M., & Beck, A. T. (2006). The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: a review of meta-analyses. Clinical Psychology Review, 26(1), pp. 17-31.
    Butler AC, et al. The Empirical Status of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy: a Review of Meta-analyses. Clin Psychol Rev. 2006;26(1):17-31. PubMed PMID: 16199119.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: a review of meta-analyses. AU - Butler,Andrew C, AU - Chapman,Jason E, AU - Forman,Evan M, AU - Beck,Aaron T, Y1 - 2005/09/30/ PY - 2004/09/20/received PY - 2005/06/07/revised PY - 2005/07/05/accepted PY - 2005/10/4/pubmed PY - 2006/5/10/medline PY - 2005/10/4/entrez SP - 17 EP - 31 JF - Clinical psychology review JO - Clin Psychol Rev VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - This review summarizes the current meta-analysis literature on treatment outcomes of CBT for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. A search of the literature resulted in a total of 16 methodologically rigorous meta-analyses. Our review focuses on effect sizes that contrast outcomes for CBT with outcomes for various control groups for each disorder, which provides an overview of the effectiveness of cognitive therapy as quantified by meta-analysis. Large effect sizes were found for CBT for unipolar depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and childhood depressive and anxiety disorders. Effect sizes for CBT of marital distress, anger, childhood somatic disorders, and chronic pain were in the moderate range. CBT was somewhat superior to antidepressants in the treatment of adult depression. CBT was equally effective as behavior therapy in the treatment of adult depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Large uncontrolled effect sizes were found for bulimia nervosa and schizophrenia. The 16 meta-analyses we reviewed support the efficacy of CBT for many disorders. While limitations of the meta-analytic approach need to be considered in interpreting the results of this review, our findings are consistent with other review methodologies that also provide support for the efficacy CBT. SN - 0272-7358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16199119/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-7358(05)00100-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -