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Effect of a low-allergen maternal diet on colic among breastfed infants: a randomized, controlled trial.
Pediatrics 2005; 116(5):e709-15Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is controversy regarding whether hypersensitivity to food proteins contributes to colic among breastfed infants.

METHODS

A randomized, controlled trial of a low-allergen maternal diet was conducted among exclusively breastfed infants presenting with colic. In the active arm, mothers excluded cow's milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, and fish from their diet; mothers in the control group continued to consume these foods. Outcomes were assessed after 7 days, as the change in cry/fuss duration over 48 hours, with validated charts. The primary end point was a reduction in cry/fuss duration of > or =25% from baseline. Mothers also assessed the responses to diet with categorical and visual analog scales.

RESULTS

Of 107 infants, 90 completed the trial (mean age: 5.7 weeks; range: 2.9-8.6 weeks; 54 male infants). Infants in both groups presented with significant distress (geometric mean: low-allergen group: 690 minutes per 48 hours; control group: 631 minutes per 48 hours). In follow-up assessments on days 8 and 9, there were significantly more responders in the low-allergen group (74% vs 37%), ie, an absolute risk reduction of 37% (95% confidence interval: 18-56%). Cry/fuss duration per 48 hours was reduced by a substantially greater amount in the low-allergen group; the adjusted geometric mean ratio was 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.97), ie, an average reduction of 21% (95% confidence interval: 3-37%). Mothers' subjective assessments of the responses to diet indicated little difference between the groups.

CONCLUSION

Exclusion of allergenic foods from the maternal diet was associated with a reduction in distressed behavior among breastfed infants with colic presenting in the first 6 weeks of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Allergy, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. allergy.clinic@rch.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16263986

Citation

Hill, David J., et al. "Effect of a Low-allergen Maternal Diet On Colic Among Breastfed Infants: a Randomized, Controlled Trial." Pediatrics, vol. 116, no. 5, 2005, pp. e709-15.
Hill DJ, Roy N, Heine RG, et al. Effect of a low-allergen maternal diet on colic among breastfed infants: a randomized, controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2005;116(5):e709-15.
Hill, D. J., Roy, N., Heine, R. G., Hosking, C. S., Francis, D. E., Brown, J., ... Carlin, J. B. (2005). Effect of a low-allergen maternal diet on colic among breastfed infants: a randomized, controlled trial. Pediatrics, 116(5), pp. e709-15.
Hill DJ, et al. Effect of a Low-allergen Maternal Diet On Colic Among Breastfed Infants: a Randomized, Controlled Trial. Pediatrics. 2005;116(5):e709-15. PubMed PMID: 16263986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of a low-allergen maternal diet on colic among breastfed infants: a randomized, controlled trial. AU - Hill,David J, AU - Roy,Neil, AU - Heine,Ralf G, AU - Hosking,Clifford S, AU - Francis,Dorothy E, AU - Brown,Jennifer, AU - Speirs,Bernadette, AU - Sadowsky,Joel, AU - Carlin,John B, PY - 2005/11/3/pubmed PY - 2005/12/29/medline PY - 2005/11/3/entrez SP - e709 EP - 15 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 116 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is controversy regarding whether hypersensitivity to food proteins contributes to colic among breastfed infants. METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial of a low-allergen maternal diet was conducted among exclusively breastfed infants presenting with colic. In the active arm, mothers excluded cow's milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, and fish from their diet; mothers in the control group continued to consume these foods. Outcomes were assessed after 7 days, as the change in cry/fuss duration over 48 hours, with validated charts. The primary end point was a reduction in cry/fuss duration of > or =25% from baseline. Mothers also assessed the responses to diet with categorical and visual analog scales. RESULTS: Of 107 infants, 90 completed the trial (mean age: 5.7 weeks; range: 2.9-8.6 weeks; 54 male infants). Infants in both groups presented with significant distress (geometric mean: low-allergen group: 690 minutes per 48 hours; control group: 631 minutes per 48 hours). In follow-up assessments on days 8 and 9, there were significantly more responders in the low-allergen group (74% vs 37%), ie, an absolute risk reduction of 37% (95% confidence interval: 18-56%). Cry/fuss duration per 48 hours was reduced by a substantially greater amount in the low-allergen group; the adjusted geometric mean ratio was 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.97), ie, an average reduction of 21% (95% confidence interval: 3-37%). Mothers' subjective assessments of the responses to diet indicated little difference between the groups. CONCLUSION: Exclusion of allergenic foods from the maternal diet was associated with a reduction in distressed behavior among breastfed infants with colic presenting in the first 6 weeks of life. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16263986/full_citation L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16263986 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -