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Homocysteine-reducing strategies improve symptoms in chronic schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

An elevated homocysteine level is reported to be a risk factor for several diseases, including Alzheimer's and cerebrovascular disease. Recently, several studies have reported that homocysteine levels are elevated in many schizophrenic patients. Homocysteine levels can be lowered by oral folic acid, B-12, and pyridoxine.

METHODS

Forty-two schizophrenic patients with plasma homocysteine levels >15 micromol/L were treated with these vitamins for 3 months and placebo for 3 months in a study with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design.

RESULTS

Homocysteine levels declined with vitamin therapy compared with placebo in all patients except for one noncompliant subject. Clinical symptoms of schizophrenia as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale declined significantly with active treatment compared with placebo. Neuropsychological test results overall, and Wisconsin Card Sort (Categories Completed) test results in particular, were significantly better after vitamin treatment than after placebo.

CONCLUSIONS

A subgroup of schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia might benefit from the simple addition of B vitamins.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Stanley Research Center and Beersheva Mental Health Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel.

    , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Biological psychiatry 60:3 2006 Aug 01 pg 265-9

    MeSH

    Adult
    Chronic Disease
    Cross-Over Studies
    Double-Blind Method
    Female
    Folic Acid
    Homocysteine
    Humans
    Hyperhomocysteinemia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
    Pyridoxine
    Schizophrenia
    Schizophrenic Psychology
    Time Factors
    Vitamin B 12
    Vitamin B Complex

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16412989

    Citation

    Levine, Joseph, et al. "Homocysteine-reducing Strategies Improve Symptoms in Chronic Schizophrenic Patients With Hyperhomocysteinemia." Biological Psychiatry, vol. 60, no. 3, 2006, pp. 265-9.
    Levine J, Stahl Z, Sela BA, et al. Homocysteine-reducing strategies improve symptoms in chronic schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. Biol Psychiatry. 2006;60(3):265-9.
    Levine, J., Stahl, Z., Sela, B. A., Ruderman, V., Shumaico, O., Babushkin, I., ... Belmaker, R. H. (2006). Homocysteine-reducing strategies improve symptoms in chronic schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. Biological Psychiatry, 60(3), pp. 265-9.
    Levine J, et al. Homocysteine-reducing Strategies Improve Symptoms in Chronic Schizophrenic Patients With Hyperhomocysteinemia. Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Aug 1;60(3):265-9. PubMed PMID: 16412989.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Homocysteine-reducing strategies improve symptoms in chronic schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia. AU - Levine,Joseph, AU - Stahl,Ziva, AU - Sela,Ben-Ami, AU - Ruderman,Vladimir, AU - Shumaico,Oleg, AU - Babushkin,Ivgeny, AU - Osher,Yamima, AU - Bersudsky,Yuly, AU - Belmaker,R H, Y1 - 2006/01/17/ PY - 2005/02/11/received PY - 2005/08/21/revised PY - 2005/10/26/accepted PY - 2006/1/18/pubmed PY - 2006/9/23/medline PY - 2006/1/18/entrez SP - 265 EP - 9 JF - Biological psychiatry JO - Biol. Psychiatry VL - 60 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: An elevated homocysteine level is reported to be a risk factor for several diseases, including Alzheimer's and cerebrovascular disease. Recently, several studies have reported that homocysteine levels are elevated in many schizophrenic patients. Homocysteine levels can be lowered by oral folic acid, B-12, and pyridoxine. METHODS: Forty-two schizophrenic patients with plasma homocysteine levels >15 micromol/L were treated with these vitamins for 3 months and placebo for 3 months in a study with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. RESULTS: Homocysteine levels declined with vitamin therapy compared with placebo in all patients except for one noncompliant subject. Clinical symptoms of schizophrenia as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale declined significantly with active treatment compared with placebo. Neuropsychological test results overall, and Wisconsin Card Sort (Categories Completed) test results in particular, were significantly better after vitamin treatment than after placebo. CONCLUSIONS: A subgroup of schizophrenic patients with hyperhomocysteinemia might benefit from the simple addition of B vitamins. SN - 0006-3223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16412989/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-3223(05)01274-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -