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Exercise is associated with reduced risk for incident dementia among persons 65 years of age and older.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alzheimer disease and other dementing disorders are major sources of morbidity and mortality in aging societies. Proven strategies to delay onset or reduce risk for dementing disorders would be greatly beneficial.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether regular exercise is associated with a reduced risk for dementia and Alzheimer disease.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington.

PARTICIPANTS

1740 persons older than age 65 years without cognitive impairment who scored above the 25th percentile on the Cognitive Ability Screening Instrument (CASI) in the Adult Changes in Thought study and who were followed biennially to identify incident dementia.

MEASUREMENTS

Baseline measurements, including exercise frequency, cognitive function, physical function, depression, health conditions, lifestyle characteristics, and other potential risk factors for dementia (for example, apolipoprotein E epsilon4); biennial assessment for dementia.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years (SD, 2.0), 158 participants developed dementia (107 developed Alzheimer disease). The incidence rate of dementia was 13.0 per 1000 person-years for participants who exercised 3 or more times per week compared with 19.7 per 1000 person-years for those who exercised fewer than 3 times per week. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio of dementia was 0.62 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.004). The interaction between exercise and performance-based physical function was statistically significant (P = 0.013). The risk reduction associated with exercise was greater in those with lower performance levels. Similar results were observed in analyses restricted to participants with incident Alzheimer disease.

LIMITATIONS

Exercise was measured by self-reported frequency. The study population had a relatively high proportion of regular exercisers at baseline.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest that regular exercise is associated with a delay in onset of dementia and Alzheimer disease, further supporting its value for elderly persons.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington 98101-1448, USA. larson.e@ghc.org

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Annals of internal medicine 144:2 2006 Jan 17 pg 73-81

    MeSH

    Age of Onset
    Aged
    Alzheimer Disease
    Comorbidity
    Dementia
    Exercise
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Incidence
    Life Style
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Survival Analysis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16418406

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise is associated with reduced risk for incident dementia among persons 65 years of age and older. AU - Larson,Eric B, AU - Wang,Li, AU - Bowen,James D, AU - McCormick,Wayne C, AU - Teri,Linda, AU - Crane,Paul, AU - Kukull,Walter, PY - 2006/1/19/pubmed PY - 2006/1/25/medline PY - 2006/1/19/entrez SP - 73 EP - 81 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 144 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease and other dementing disorders are major sources of morbidity and mortality in aging societies. Proven strategies to delay onset or reduce risk for dementing disorders would be greatly beneficial. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regular exercise is associated with a reduced risk for dementia and Alzheimer disease. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, Washington. PARTICIPANTS: 1740 persons older than age 65 years without cognitive impairment who scored above the 25th percentile on the Cognitive Ability Screening Instrument (CASI) in the Adult Changes in Thought study and who were followed biennially to identify incident dementia. MEASUREMENTS: Baseline measurements, including exercise frequency, cognitive function, physical function, depression, health conditions, lifestyle characteristics, and other potential risk factors for dementia (for example, apolipoprotein E epsilon4); biennial assessment for dementia. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years (SD, 2.0), 158 participants developed dementia (107 developed Alzheimer disease). The incidence rate of dementia was 13.0 per 1000 person-years for participants who exercised 3 or more times per week compared with 19.7 per 1000 person-years for those who exercised fewer than 3 times per week. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio of dementia was 0.62 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.004). The interaction between exercise and performance-based physical function was statistically significant (P = 0.013). The risk reduction associated with exercise was greater in those with lower performance levels. Similar results were observed in analyses restricted to participants with incident Alzheimer disease. LIMITATIONS: Exercise was measured by self-reported frequency. The study population had a relatively high proportion of regular exercisers at baseline. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that regular exercise is associated with a delay in onset of dementia and Alzheimer disease, further supporting its value for elderly persons. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16418406/full_citation L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?volume=144&issue=2&page=73 ER -