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Longitudinal analysis of the association between vasomotor symptoms and race/ethnicity across the menopausal transition: study of women's health across the nation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We investigated whether vasomotor symptom reporting or patterns of change in symptom reporting over the perimenopausal transition among women enrolled in a national study differed according to race/ethnicity. We also sought to determine whether racial/ethnic differences were explained by sociodemographic, health, or lifestyle factors.

METHODS

We followed 3198 women enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation during 1996 through 2002. We analyzed frequency of vasomotor symptom reporting using longitudinal multiple logistic regressions.

RESULTS

Rates of vasomotor symptom reporting were highest among African Americans (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.21, 2.20). The transition to late perimenopause exhibited the strongest association with vasomotor symptoms (adjusted OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 4.80, 9.20). Other risk factors were age (adjusted OR=1.17; 95% CI=1.13, 1.21), having less than a college education (adjusted OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.40, 2.61), increasing body mass index (adjusted OR=1.03 per unit of increase; 95% CI=1.01, 1.04), smoking (adjusted OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.25, 2.12), and anxiety symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI=2.33, 4.12).

CONCLUSIONS

Among the risk factors assessed, vasomotor symptoms were most strongly associated with menopausal status. After adjustment for covariates, symptoms were reported most often in all racial/ethnic groups in late perimenopause and nearly as often in postmenopause.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. ebgold@ucdavis.edu

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of public health 96:7 2006 Jul pg 1226-35

    MeSH

    Adult
    African Americans
    Asian Americans
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Health Status
    Hispanic Americans
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Life Style
    Logistic Models
    Longitudinal Studies
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Perimenopause
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Sweating
    United States
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16735636

    Citation

    Gold, Ellen B., et al. "Longitudinal Analysis of the Association Between Vasomotor Symptoms and Race/ethnicity Across the Menopausal Transition: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 96, no. 7, 2006, pp. 1226-35.
    Gold EB, Colvin A, Avis N, et al. Longitudinal analysis of the association between vasomotor symptoms and race/ethnicity across the menopausal transition: study of women's health across the nation. Am J Public Health. 2006;96(7):1226-35.
    Gold, E. B., Colvin, A., Avis, N., Bromberger, J., Greendale, G. A., Powell, L., ... Matthews, K. (2006). Longitudinal analysis of the association between vasomotor symptoms and race/ethnicity across the menopausal transition: study of women's health across the nation. American Journal of Public Health, 96(7), pp. 1226-35.
    Gold EB, et al. Longitudinal Analysis of the Association Between Vasomotor Symptoms and Race/ethnicity Across the Menopausal Transition: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. Am J Public Health. 2006;96(7):1226-35. PubMed PMID: 16735636.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal analysis of the association between vasomotor symptoms and race/ethnicity across the menopausal transition: study of women's health across the nation. AU - Gold,Ellen B, AU - Colvin,Alicia, AU - Avis,Nancy, AU - Bromberger,Joyce, AU - Greendale,Gail A, AU - Powell,Lynda, AU - Sternfeld,Barbara, AU - Matthews,Karen, Y1 - 2006/05/30/ PY - 2006/6/1/pubmed PY - 2006/7/15/medline PY - 2006/6/1/entrez SP - 1226 EP - 35 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 96 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether vasomotor symptom reporting or patterns of change in symptom reporting over the perimenopausal transition among women enrolled in a national study differed according to race/ethnicity. We also sought to determine whether racial/ethnic differences were explained by sociodemographic, health, or lifestyle factors. METHODS: We followed 3198 women enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation during 1996 through 2002. We analyzed frequency of vasomotor symptom reporting using longitudinal multiple logistic regressions. RESULTS: Rates of vasomotor symptom reporting were highest among African Americans (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.21, 2.20). The transition to late perimenopause exhibited the strongest association with vasomotor symptoms (adjusted OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 4.80, 9.20). Other risk factors were age (adjusted OR=1.17; 95% CI=1.13, 1.21), having less than a college education (adjusted OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.40, 2.61), increasing body mass index (adjusted OR=1.03 per unit of increase; 95% CI=1.01, 1.04), smoking (adjusted OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.25, 2.12), and anxiety symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI=2.33, 4.12). CONCLUSIONS: Among the risk factors assessed, vasomotor symptoms were most strongly associated with menopausal status. After adjustment for covariates, symptoms were reported most often in all racial/ethnic groups in late perimenopause and nearly as often in postmenopause. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16735636/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajph.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2005.066936?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -