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The incidence of fibromyalgia and its associated comorbidities: a population-based retrospective cohort study based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes.
J Clin Rheumatol 2006; 12(3):124-8JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The epidemiology of fibromyalgia is poorly defined. The incidence of fibromyalgia has not been determined using a large population base. Previous studies based on prevalence data demonstrated that females are 7 times more likely to have fibromyalgia than males and that the peak age for females is during the childbearing years.

OBJECTIVE

We have calculated the incidence rate of fibromyalgia in a large, stable population and determined the strength of association between fibromyalgia and 7 comorbid conditions.

METHODS

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a large, stable health insurance claims database (62,000 nationwide enrollees per year). Claims from 1997 to 2002 were examined using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes to identify fibromyalgia cases (ICD code 729.1) and 7 predetermined comorbid conditions.

RESULTS

A total of 2595 incident cases of fibromyalgia were identified between 1997 and 2002. Age-adjusted incidence rates were 6.88 cases per 1000 person-years for males and 11.28 cases per 1000 person-years for females. Females were 1.64 times (95% confidence interval = 1.59-1.69) more likely than males to have fibromyalgia. Patients with fibromyalgia were 2.14 to 7.05 times more likely to have one or more of the following comorbid conditions: depression, anxiety, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis.

CONCLUSION

Females are more likely to be diagnosed with fibromyalgia than males, although to a substantially smaller degree than previously reported, and there are strong associations for comorbid conditions that are commonly thought to be associated with fibromyalgia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108, USA. peter.weir@hsc.utah.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16755239

Citation

Weir, Peter T., et al. "The Incidence of Fibromyalgia and Its Associated Comorbidities: a Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study Based On International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision Codes." Journal of Clinical Rheumatology : Practical Reports On Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Diseases, vol. 12, no. 3, 2006, pp. 124-8.
Weir PT, Harlan GA, Nkoy FL, et al. The incidence of fibromyalgia and its associated comorbidities: a population-based retrospective cohort study based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. J Clin Rheumatol. 2006;12(3):124-8.
Weir, P. T., Harlan, G. A., Nkoy, F. L., Jones, S. S., Hegmann, K. T., Gren, L. H., & Lyon, J. L. (2006). The incidence of fibromyalgia and its associated comorbidities: a population-based retrospective cohort study based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology : Practical Reports On Rheumatic & Musculoskeletal Diseases, 12(3), pp. 124-8.
Weir PT, et al. The Incidence of Fibromyalgia and Its Associated Comorbidities: a Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study Based On International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision Codes. J Clin Rheumatol. 2006;12(3):124-8. PubMed PMID: 16755239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The incidence of fibromyalgia and its associated comorbidities: a population-based retrospective cohort study based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. AU - Weir,Peter T, AU - Harlan,Gregory A, AU - Nkoy,Flo L, AU - Jones,Spencer S, AU - Hegmann,Kurt T, AU - Gren,Lisa H, AU - Lyon,Joseph L, PY - 2006/6/7/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/6/7/entrez SP - 124 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical rheumatology : practical reports on rheumatic & musculoskeletal diseases JO - J Clin Rheumatol VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of fibromyalgia is poorly defined. The incidence of fibromyalgia has not been determined using a large population base. Previous studies based on prevalence data demonstrated that females are 7 times more likely to have fibromyalgia than males and that the peak age for females is during the childbearing years. OBJECTIVE: We have calculated the incidence rate of fibromyalgia in a large, stable population and determined the strength of association between fibromyalgia and 7 comorbid conditions. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a large, stable health insurance claims database (62,000 nationwide enrollees per year). Claims from 1997 to 2002 were examined using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes to identify fibromyalgia cases (ICD code 729.1) and 7 predetermined comorbid conditions. RESULTS: A total of 2595 incident cases of fibromyalgia were identified between 1997 and 2002. Age-adjusted incidence rates were 6.88 cases per 1000 person-years for males and 11.28 cases per 1000 person-years for females. Females were 1.64 times (95% confidence interval = 1.59-1.69) more likely than males to have fibromyalgia. Patients with fibromyalgia were 2.14 to 7.05 times more likely to have one or more of the following comorbid conditions: depression, anxiety, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Females are more likely to be diagnosed with fibromyalgia than males, although to a substantially smaller degree than previously reported, and there are strong associations for comorbid conditions that are commonly thought to be associated with fibromyalgia. SN - 1076-1608 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16755239/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16755239 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -