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Pesticide exposure and risk for Parkinson's disease.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Chronic, low-dose exposure to pesticides is suspected to increase the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD), but data are inconclusive.

METHODS

We prospectively examined whether individuals exposed to pesticides have higher risk for PD than those not exposed. The study population comprised participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a longitudinal investigation of US men and women initiated in 1992 by the American Cancer Society. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 1997, 1999, and 2001. The 143,325 individuals who returned the 2001 survey and did not have a diagnosis or symptoms of PD at baseline (1992) were included in the analyses.

RESULTS

Exposure to pesticides was reported by 7,864 participants (5.7%), including 1,956 farmers, ranchers, or fishermen. Individuals exposed to pesticides had a 70% higher incidence of PD than those not exposed (adjusted relative risk, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.3; p = 0.002). The relative risk for pesticide exposure was similar in farmers and nonfarmers. No relation was found between risk for PD and exposure to asbestos, chemical/acids/solvents, coal or stone dust, or eight other occupational exposures.

INTERPRETATION

These data support the hypothesis that exposure to pesticides may increase risk for PD. Future studies should seek to identify the specific chemicals responsible for this association.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. aascheri@hsph.harvard.edu

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Annals of neurology 60:2 2006 Aug pg 197-203

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cohort Studies
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Parkinson Disease, Secondary
    Pesticides
    Risk
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16802290

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Pesticide exposure and risk for Parkinson's disease. AU - Ascherio,Alberto, AU - Chen,Honglei, AU - Weisskopf,Marc G, AU - O'Reilly,Eilis, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Calle,Eugenia E, AU - Schwarzschild,Michael A, AU - Thun,Michael J, PY - 2006/6/28/pubmed PY - 2006/9/16/medline PY - 2006/6/28/entrez SP - 197 EP - 203 JF - Annals of neurology JO - Ann. Neurol. VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Chronic, low-dose exposure to pesticides is suspected to increase the risk for Parkinson's disease (PD), but data are inconclusive. METHODS: We prospectively examined whether individuals exposed to pesticides have higher risk for PD than those not exposed. The study population comprised participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a longitudinal investigation of US men and women initiated in 1992 by the American Cancer Society. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 1997, 1999, and 2001. The 143,325 individuals who returned the 2001 survey and did not have a diagnosis or symptoms of PD at baseline (1992) were included in the analyses. RESULTS: Exposure to pesticides was reported by 7,864 participants (5.7%), including 1,956 farmers, ranchers, or fishermen. Individuals exposed to pesticides had a 70% higher incidence of PD than those not exposed (adjusted relative risk, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.3; p = 0.002). The relative risk for pesticide exposure was similar in farmers and nonfarmers. No relation was found between risk for PD and exposure to asbestos, chemical/acids/solvents, coal or stone dust, or eight other occupational exposures. INTERPRETATION: These data support the hypothesis that exposure to pesticides may increase risk for PD. Future studies should seek to identify the specific chemicals responsible for this association. SN - 0364-5134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16802290/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.20904 ER -