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Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis.
Lancet 1991; 338(8772):899-902Lct

Abstract

Fasting is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, but most patients relapse on reintroduction of food. The effect of fasting followed by one year of a vegetarian diet was assessed in a randomised, single-blind controlled trial. 27 patients were allocated to a four-week stay at a health farm. After an initial 7-10 day subtotal fast, they were put on an individually adjusted gluten-free vegan diet for 3.5 months. The food was then gradually changed to a lactovegetarian diet for the remainder of the study. A control group of 26 patients stayed for four weeks at a convalescent home, but ate an ordinary diet throughout the whole study period. After four weeks at the health farm the diet group showed a significant improvement in number of tender joints, Ritchie's articular index, number of swollen joints, pain score, duration of morning stiffness, grip strength, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and a health assessment questionnaire score. In the control group, only pain score improved score. In the control group, only pain score improved significantly. The benefits in the diet group were still present after one year, and evaluation of the whole course showed significant advantages for the diet group in all measured indices. This dietary regimen seems to be a useful supplement to conventional medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Practice, University of Oslo, Norway.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1681264

Citation

Kjeldsen-Kragh, J, et al. "Controlled Trial of Fasting and One-year Vegetarian Diet in Rheumatoid Arthritis." Lancet (London, England), vol. 338, no. 8772, 1991, pp. 899-902.
Kjeldsen-Kragh J, Haugen M, Borchgrevink CF, et al. Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis. Lancet. 1991;338(8772):899-902.
Kjeldsen-Kragh, J., Haugen, M., Borchgrevink, C. F., Laerum, E., Eek, M., Mowinkel, P., ... Førre, O. (1991). Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis. Lancet (London, England), 338(8772), pp. 899-902.
Kjeldsen-Kragh J, et al. Controlled Trial of Fasting and One-year Vegetarian Diet in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Lancet. 1991 Oct 12;338(8772):899-902. PubMed PMID: 1681264.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis. AU - Kjeldsen-Kragh,J, AU - Haugen,M, AU - Borchgrevink,C F, AU - Laerum,E, AU - Eek,M, AU - Mowinkel,P, AU - Hovi,K, AU - Førre,O, PY - 1991/10/12/pubmed PY - 1991/10/12/medline PY - 1991/10/12/entrez SP - 899 EP - 902 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 338 IS - 8772 N2 - Fasting is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, but most patients relapse on reintroduction of food. The effect of fasting followed by one year of a vegetarian diet was assessed in a randomised, single-blind controlled trial. 27 patients were allocated to a four-week stay at a health farm. After an initial 7-10 day subtotal fast, they were put on an individually adjusted gluten-free vegan diet for 3.5 months. The food was then gradually changed to a lactovegetarian diet for the remainder of the study. A control group of 26 patients stayed for four weeks at a convalescent home, but ate an ordinary diet throughout the whole study period. After four weeks at the health farm the diet group showed a significant improvement in number of tender joints, Ritchie's articular index, number of swollen joints, pain score, duration of morning stiffness, grip strength, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and a health assessment questionnaire score. In the control group, only pain score improved score. In the control group, only pain score improved significantly. The benefits in the diet group were still present after one year, and evaluation of the whole course showed significant advantages for the diet group in all measured indices. This dietary regimen seems to be a useful supplement to conventional medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. SN - 0140-6736 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1681264/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0140-6736(91)91770-U DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -