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Spontaneous hypothyroidism in adult women is predicted by small body size at birth and during childhood.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relationships of early growth with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes have received considerable attention. It is not known whether fetal or childhood growth is linked with autoimmune disorders.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to assess whether the risk of adult-onset spontaneous hypothyroidism is predicted by body size at birth and during childhood.

DESIGN AND SETTING

We conducted a birth cohort study in Helsinki, Finland.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 293 women who were born between 1934 and 1944 and had their heights and weights recorded at birth and during childhood participated in the study.

MEASUREMENTS

We measured spontaneous hypothyroidism, defined as: 1) a disease history confirmed from medical records, or 2) previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism (TSH > 10 mU/liter).

RESULTS

Twenty women (6.8%) had spontaneous hypothyroidism; 18 had been diagnosed previously, between 43 and 65 yr of age, and two had undiagnosed subclinical hypothyroidism. In addition, 59 women were thyroid peroxidase antibody positive. Compared with the 214 thyroid peroxidase antibody-negative women with no thyroid disorder, those with spontaneous hypothyroidism had on average 252 g [95% confidence interval (CI), 61 to 443 g; P = 0.01] lower birth weight and 1.2 cm (95% CI, 0.5 to 2.0 cm; P = 0.002) shorter length at birth. The odds of developing hypothyroidism increased 4.4-fold per kilogram decrease in birth weight (95% CI, 1.4 to 14.1). Hypothyroid subjects had been shorter in early childhood and had lower body mass index during later childhood.

CONCLUSIONS

Small body size at birth and during childhood increases the risk of spontaneous hypothyroidism in adult women.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. eero.kajantie@helsinki.fi

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aging
    Autoantibodies
    Autoantigens
    Birth Weight
    Body Height
    Body Size
    Body Weight
    Cohort Studies
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Hypothyroidism
    Iodide Peroxidase
    Iron-Binding Proteins
    Middle Aged
    Prognosis
    Thyrotropin
    Thyroxine

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16984989

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Spontaneous hypothyroidism in adult women is predicted by small body size at birth and during childhood. AU - Kajantie,Eero, AU - Phillips,David I W, AU - Osmond,Clive, AU - Barker,David J P, AU - Forsén,Tom, AU - Eriksson,Johan G, Y1 - 2006/09/19/ PY - 2006/9/19/aheadofprint PY - 2006/9/21/pubmed PY - 2007/1/26/medline PY - 2006/9/21/entrez SP - 4953 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 91 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationships of early growth with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes have received considerable attention. It is not known whether fetal or childhood growth is linked with autoimmune disorders. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess whether the risk of adult-onset spontaneous hypothyroidism is predicted by body size at birth and during childhood. DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a birth cohort study in Helsinki, Finland. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 293 women who were born between 1934 and 1944 and had their heights and weights recorded at birth and during childhood participated in the study. MEASUREMENTS: We measured spontaneous hypothyroidism, defined as: 1) a disease history confirmed from medical records, or 2) previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism (TSH > 10 mU/liter). RESULTS: Twenty women (6.8%) had spontaneous hypothyroidism; 18 had been diagnosed previously, between 43 and 65 yr of age, and two had undiagnosed subclinical hypothyroidism. In addition, 59 women were thyroid peroxidase antibody positive. Compared with the 214 thyroid peroxidase antibody-negative women with no thyroid disorder, those with spontaneous hypothyroidism had on average 252 g [95% confidence interval (CI), 61 to 443 g; P = 0.01] lower birth weight and 1.2 cm (95% CI, 0.5 to 2.0 cm; P = 0.002) shorter length at birth. The odds of developing hypothyroidism increased 4.4-fold per kilogram decrease in birth weight (95% CI, 1.4 to 14.1). Hypothyroid subjects had been shorter in early childhood and had lower body mass index during later childhood. CONCLUSIONS: Small body size at birth and during childhood increases the risk of spontaneous hypothyroidism in adult women. SN - 0021-972X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16984989/full_citation L2 - http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.1210/jc.2006-1093?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed ER -