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A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG for abdominal pain disorders in children.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPD) are common in school-aged children; however, there is no reliable treatment.

AIM

To determine the efficacy of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for treating FAPD in children.

METHODS

A total of 104 children who fulfilled the Rome II criteria for functional dyspepsia (FD), or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), or functional abdominal pain (FAP) were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in which they received LGG (n = 52), or placebo (n = 52) for 4 weeks.

RESULTS

For the overall study population, those in the LGG group were more likely to have treatment success (no pain) than those in the placebo group (25% vs. 9.6%, relative benefit (RB) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-6.6, number needed to treat (NNT) 7, 95% CI: 4-123). For children with IBS (n = 37), those in the LGG group were more likely to have treatment success than those in the placebo group (33% vs. 5%, RB 6.3, 95% CI: 1.2-38, NNT 4, 95% CI: 2-36) and reduced frequency of pain (P = 0.02), but not pain severity (P = 0.10). For the FD group (n = 20) and FAP group (n = 47), no differences were found.

CONCLUSION

The LGG appears to moderately increase treatment success, particularly among children with IBS.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, The Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

    , ,

    Source

    Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics 25:2 2007 Jan 15 pg 177-84

    MeSH

    Abdominal Pain
    Adolescent
    Child
    Double-Blind Method
    Dyspepsia
    Female
    Humans
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Lactobacillus rhamnosus
    Male
    Probiotics
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17229242

    Citation

    Gawrońska, A, et al. "A Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial of Lactobacillus GG for Abdominal Pain Disorders in Children." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 25, no. 2, 2007, pp. 177-84.
    Gawrońska A, Dziechciarz P, Horvath A, et al. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG for abdominal pain disorders in children. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007;25(2):177-84.
    Gawrońska, A., Dziechciarz, P., Horvath, A., & Szajewska, H. (2007). A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG for abdominal pain disorders in children. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 25(2), pp. 177-84.
    Gawrońska A, et al. A Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial of Lactobacillus GG for Abdominal Pain Disorders in Children. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Jan 15;25(2):177-84. PubMed PMID: 17229242.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG for abdominal pain disorders in children. AU - Gawrońska,A, AU - Dziechciarz,P, AU - Horvath,A, AU - Szajewska,H, PY - 2007/1/19/pubmed PY - 2007/5/22/medline PY - 2007/1/19/entrez SP - 177 EP - 84 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPD) are common in school-aged children; however, there is no reliable treatment. AIM: To determine the efficacy of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for treating FAPD in children. METHODS: A total of 104 children who fulfilled the Rome II criteria for functional dyspepsia (FD), or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), or functional abdominal pain (FAP) were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in which they received LGG (n = 52), or placebo (n = 52) for 4 weeks. RESULTS: For the overall study population, those in the LGG group were more likely to have treatment success (no pain) than those in the placebo group (25% vs. 9.6%, relative benefit (RB) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-6.6, number needed to treat (NNT) 7, 95% CI: 4-123). For children with IBS (n = 37), those in the LGG group were more likely to have treatment success than those in the placebo group (33% vs. 5%, RB 6.3, 95% CI: 1.2-38, NNT 4, 95% CI: 2-36) and reduced frequency of pain (P = 0.02), but not pain severity (P = 0.10). For the FD group (n = 20) and FAP group (n = 47), no differences were found. CONCLUSION: The LGG appears to moderately increase treatment success, particularly among children with IBS. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17229242/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.03175.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -