Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Exercise participation, body mass index, and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal age.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Menopausal symptoms can affect women's health and wellbeing. It is important to develop interventions to alleviate symptoms, especially given recent evidence resulting in many women no longer choosing to take hormone replacement therapy. Exercise may prove useful in alleviating symptoms, although evidence on its effectiveness has been conflicting.

AIM

To examine the association between exercise participation, body mass index (BMI), and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal-age.

DESIGN OF STUDY

Survey of women of menopausal age.

SETTING

West Midlands, England.

METHOD

Women aged 46-55 years (n = 2399) registered with six general practices in the West Midlands were sent a questionnaire containing items relating to demographics, lifestyle factors, weight, height, exercise participation, menopausal bleeding patterns, and health-related quality of life (including vasomotor symptoms).

RESULTS

One thousand two hundred and six (50.3%) women replied. Women who were regularly active reported better health-related quality of life scores than women who were not regularly active (P<0.01 for all significant subscales). No difference in vasomotor symptoms was recorded for exercise status. Women who were obese reported significantly higher vasomotor symptom scores than women of normal weight (P<0.01). Women who were obese reported significantly higher somatic symptoms (P<0.001) and attractiveness concern scores (P<0.001) than women of normal weight or those who were overweight.

CONCLUSION

The data suggest a positive association between somatic and psychological dimensions of health-related quality of life and participation in regular exercise. Women with BMI scores in the normal range reported lower vasomotor symptom scores and better health-related quality of life scores than heavier women. Further evidence from high-quality randomised controlled trials is required to assess whether exercise interventions are effective for management of menopausal symptoms.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Primary Care and General Practice, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham. a.daley@bham.ac.uk

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aging
    Body Mass Index
    Exercise
    Female
    Health Status
    Humans
    Life Style
    Menopause
    Middle Aged
    Quality of Life
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Treatment Outcome
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17266830

    Citation

    Daley, Amanda, et al. "Exercise Participation, Body Mass Index, and Health-related Quality of Life in Women of Menopausal Age." The British Journal of General Practice : the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, vol. 57, no. 535, 2007, pp. 130-5.
    Daley A, Macarthur C, Stokes-Lampard H, et al. Exercise participation, body mass index, and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal age. Br J Gen Pract. 2007;57(535):130-5.
    Daley, A., Macarthur, C., Stokes-Lampard, H., McManus, R., Wilson, S., & Mutrie, N. (2007). Exercise participation, body mass index, and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal age. The British Journal of General Practice : the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 57(535), pp. 130-5.
    Daley A, et al. Exercise Participation, Body Mass Index, and Health-related Quality of Life in Women of Menopausal Age. Br J Gen Pract. 2007;57(535):130-5. PubMed PMID: 17266830.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise participation, body mass index, and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal age. AU - Daley,Amanda, AU - Macarthur,Christine, AU - Stokes-Lampard,Helen, AU - McManus,Richard, AU - Wilson,Sue, AU - Mutrie,Nanette, PY - 2007/2/3/pubmed PY - 2007/8/1/medline PY - 2007/2/3/entrez SP - 130 EP - 5 JF - The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners JO - Br J Gen Pract VL - 57 IS - 535 N2 - BACKGROUND: Menopausal symptoms can affect women's health and wellbeing. It is important to develop interventions to alleviate symptoms, especially given recent evidence resulting in many women no longer choosing to take hormone replacement therapy. Exercise may prove useful in alleviating symptoms, although evidence on its effectiveness has been conflicting. AIM: To examine the association between exercise participation, body mass index (BMI), and health-related quality of life in women of menopausal-age. DESIGN OF STUDY: Survey of women of menopausal age. SETTING: West Midlands, England. METHOD: Women aged 46-55 years (n = 2399) registered with six general practices in the West Midlands were sent a questionnaire containing items relating to demographics, lifestyle factors, weight, height, exercise participation, menopausal bleeding patterns, and health-related quality of life (including vasomotor symptoms). RESULTS: One thousand two hundred and six (50.3%) women replied. Women who were regularly active reported better health-related quality of life scores than women who were not regularly active (P<0.01 for all significant subscales). No difference in vasomotor symptoms was recorded for exercise status. Women who were obese reported significantly higher vasomotor symptom scores than women of normal weight (P<0.01). Women who were obese reported significantly higher somatic symptoms (P<0.001) and attractiveness concern scores (P<0.001) than women of normal weight or those who were overweight. CONCLUSION: The data suggest a positive association between somatic and psychological dimensions of health-related quality of life and participation in regular exercise. Women with BMI scores in the normal range reported lower vasomotor symptom scores and better health-related quality of life scores than heavier women. Further evidence from high-quality randomised controlled trials is required to assess whether exercise interventions are effective for management of menopausal symptoms. SN - 0960-1643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17266830/full_citation L2 - http://bjgp.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17266830 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -