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Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH.

DESIGN

The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression.

RESULTS

Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile-OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in beta-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither alpha- nor gamma-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively).

CONCLUSION

Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Fruit
    Humans
    Male
    Micronutrients
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Prostatic Hyperplasia
    Risk Factors
    United States
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17284753

    Citation

    Rohrmann, Sabine, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Intake of Micronutrients, and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in US Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 85, no. 2, 2007, pp. 523-9.
    Rohrmann S, Giovannucci E, Willett WC, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85(2):523-9.
    Rohrmann, S., Giovannucci, E., Willett, W. C., & Platz, E. A. (2007). Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85(2), pp. 523-9.
    Rohrmann S, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Intake of Micronutrients, and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in US Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85(2):523-9. PubMed PMID: 17284753.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men. AU - Rohrmann,Sabine, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, PY - 2007/2/8/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2007/2/8/entrez SP - 523 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 85 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. DESIGN: The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression. RESULTS: Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile-OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in beta-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither alpha- nor gamma-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17284753/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/85.2.523 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -