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Body mass and colorectal cancer risk in the NIH-AARP cohort.

Abstract

In most studies, body mass index (BMI) has been associated with increased risk of colorectal or colon cancer in men, but the relation is weaker and less consistent for women, possibly because of interactions with age or hormone replacement therapy. The authors examined the relation between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence in a large, prospective US cohort of 307,708 men and 209,436 women from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. During follow-up of the cohort from 1995 to 2000, 2,314 cases of colorectal cancer were observed in men and 1,029 in women. BMI was related to increased risk of incident colon cancer, but not rectal cancer, for both men and women. For men, relative risks of colon cancer for a BMI of 18.5-<23, 23-<25, 25-<27.5, 27.5-<30, 30-<32.5, 32.5-<35, 35-<40, and > or = 40 kg/m(2) were 1.0 (referent), 1.11, 1.22, 1.44, 1.53, 1.57, 1.71, and 2.39, respectively (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 3.58; p-trend < 0.0005). Corresponding relative risks for women were 1.0, 1.20, 1.29, 1.31, 1.28, 1.13, 1.46, and 1.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.98, 2.25; p-trend = 0.02). BMI was related to colon cancer risk for younger (aged 50-66 years) but not older (aged 67-71 years) women. The association was not modified by hormone replacement therapy in women or physical activity in men or women.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA. adamske@mail.nih.gov

    , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 166:1 2007 Jul 01 pg 36-45

    MeSH

    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Confidence Intervals
    Female
    Hormone Replacement Therapy
    Humans
    Incidence
    Life Style
    Male
    Obesity
    Registries
    Risk Factors
    Sex Distribution
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17449892

    Citation

    Adams, Kenneth F., et al. "Body Mass and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Cohort." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 166, no. 1, 2007, pp. 36-45.
    Adams KF, Leitzmann MF, Albanes D, et al. Body mass and colorectal cancer risk in the NIH-AARP cohort. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;166(1):36-45.
    Adams, K. F., Leitzmann, M. F., Albanes, D., Kipnis, V., Mouw, T., Hollenbeck, A., & Schatzkin, A. (2007). Body mass and colorectal cancer risk in the NIH-AARP cohort. American Journal of Epidemiology, 166(1), pp. 36-45.
    Adams KF, et al. Body Mass and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Cohort. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jul 1;166(1):36-45. PubMed PMID: 17449892.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass and colorectal cancer risk in the NIH-AARP cohort. AU - Adams,Kenneth F, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Albanes,Demetrius, AU - Kipnis,Victor, AU - Mouw,Traci, AU - Hollenbeck,Al, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, Y1 - 2007/04/21/ PY - 2007/4/24/pubmed PY - 2007/8/3/medline PY - 2007/4/24/entrez SP - 36 EP - 45 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 166 IS - 1 N2 - In most studies, body mass index (BMI) has been associated with increased risk of colorectal or colon cancer in men, but the relation is weaker and less consistent for women, possibly because of interactions with age or hormone replacement therapy. The authors examined the relation between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence in a large, prospective US cohort of 307,708 men and 209,436 women from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. During follow-up of the cohort from 1995 to 2000, 2,314 cases of colorectal cancer were observed in men and 1,029 in women. BMI was related to increased risk of incident colon cancer, but not rectal cancer, for both men and women. For men, relative risks of colon cancer for a BMI of 18.5-<23, 23-<25, 25-<27.5, 27.5-<30, 30-<32.5, 32.5-<35, 35-<40, and > or = 40 kg/m(2) were 1.0 (referent), 1.11, 1.22, 1.44, 1.53, 1.57, 1.71, and 2.39, respectively (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 3.58; p-trend < 0.0005). Corresponding relative risks for women were 1.0, 1.20, 1.29, 1.31, 1.28, 1.13, 1.46, and 1.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.98, 2.25; p-trend = 0.02). BMI was related to colon cancer risk for younger (aged 50-66 years) but not older (aged 67-71 years) women. The association was not modified by hormone replacement therapy in women or physical activity in men or women. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17449892/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -