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Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword.

Abstract

An extensive body of data shows concordant J-shaped associations between alcohol intake and a variety of adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, stroke, dementia, Raynaud's phenomenon, and all-cause mortality. Light to moderate alcohol consumption (up to 1 drink daily for women and 1 or 2 drinks daily for men) is associated with cardioprotective benefits, whereas increasingly excessive consumption results in proportional worsening of outcomes. Alcohol consumption confers cardiovascular protection predominately through improvements in insulin sensitivity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The ethanol itself, rather than specific components of various alcoholic beverages, appears to be the major factor in conferring health benefits. Low-dose daily alcohol is associated with better health than less frequent consumption. Binge drinking, even among otherwise light drinkers, increases cardiovascular events and mortality. Alcohol should not be universally prescribed for health enhancement to nondrinking individuals owing to the lack of randomized outcome data and the potential for problem drinking.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. jhokeefe@cc-pc.com

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Alcohol Drinking
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cardiovascular System
    Central Nervous System Depressants
    Ethanol
    Glucose Metabolism Disorders
    Humans
    Risk Assessment

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17825708

    Citation

    O'Keefe, James H., et al. "Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health: the Razor-sharp Double-edged Sword." Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 50, no. 11, 2007, pp. 1009-14.
    O'Keefe JH, Bybee KA, Lavie CJ. Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007;50(11):1009-14.
    O'Keefe, J. H., Bybee, K. A., & Lavie, C. J. (2007). Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 50(11), pp. 1009-14.
    O'Keefe JH, Bybee KA, Lavie CJ. Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health: the Razor-sharp Double-edged Sword. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Sep 11;50(11):1009-14. PubMed PMID: 17825708.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword. AU - O'Keefe,James H, AU - Bybee,Kevin A, AU - Lavie,Carl J, PY - 2007/02/14/received PY - 2007/04/19/revised PY - 2007/04/30/accepted PY - 2007/9/11/pubmed PY - 2007/9/29/medline PY - 2007/9/11/entrez SP - 1009 EP - 14 JF - Journal of the American College of Cardiology JO - J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. VL - 50 IS - 11 N2 - An extensive body of data shows concordant J-shaped associations between alcohol intake and a variety of adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, stroke, dementia, Raynaud's phenomenon, and all-cause mortality. Light to moderate alcohol consumption (up to 1 drink daily for women and 1 or 2 drinks daily for men) is associated with cardioprotective benefits, whereas increasingly excessive consumption results in proportional worsening of outcomes. Alcohol consumption confers cardiovascular protection predominately through improvements in insulin sensitivity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The ethanol itself, rather than specific components of various alcoholic beverages, appears to be the major factor in conferring health benefits. Low-dose daily alcohol is associated with better health than less frequent consumption. Binge drinking, even among otherwise light drinkers, increases cardiovascular events and mortality. Alcohol should not be universally prescribed for health enhancement to nondrinking individuals owing to the lack of randomized outcome data and the potential for problem drinking. SN - 1558-3597 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17825708/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0735-1097(07)02007-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -