Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intensive nutritional supplements can improve outcomes in stroke rehabilitation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Poor nutrition is a common complication of strokes severe enough to require inpatient rehabilitation. We therefore tested whether intensive nutritional supplements given to undernourished patients from the time of their admission to a specialized stroke rehabilitation service would improve patient outcomes.

METHODS

Randomized, prospective, double-blind, single center study comparing intensive nutritional supplementation to routine nutritional supplementation in 116 undernourished patients admitted to a stroke service. The analysis included the 90% of patients who were not lost to follow-up due to acute or subacute hospitalization (n = 102; 51 in each group). The nutritional supplements are commercially available and Food and Drug Administration approved. The primary outcome variable was change in total score on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The secondary outcome measurements included the FIM motor and cognitive subscores, length of stay (taken from day of admission), 2-minute and 6-minute timed walk tests measured at admission and on discharge, and discharge disposition (home/not home).

RESULTS

Patients receiving intensive nutritional supplementation improved more than those on standard nutritional supplements on measures of motor function (total FIM, FIM motor subscore, 2-minute and 6-minute timed walk tests, all significant at p < 0.002). They did not, however, improve on measures of cognition (FIM cognition score). A higher proportion of patients who received the intensive nutritional supplementation went home compared to those on standard supplementation (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Intensive nutritional supplementation, using readily available commercial preparations, improves motor recovery in previously undernourished patients receiving intensive in-patient rehabilitation after stroke.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    VA Medical Center, 921 NE 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. mhrabadi@gmail.com

    , , ,

    Source

    Neurology 71:23 2008 Dec 02 pg 1856-61

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cognition
    Dietary Supplements
    Disability Evaluation
    Double-Blind Method
    Enteral Nutrition
    Female
    Humans
    Length of Stay
    Male
    Motor Activity
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Prospective Studies
    Recovery of Function
    Rehabilitation Centers
    Severity of Illness Index
    Stroke Rehabilitation
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18946003

    Citation

    Rabadi, M H., et al. "Intensive Nutritional Supplements Can Improve Outcomes in Stroke Rehabilitation." Neurology, vol. 71, no. 23, 2008, pp. 1856-61.
    Rabadi MH, Coar PL, Lukin M, et al. Intensive nutritional supplements can improve outcomes in stroke rehabilitation. Neurology. 2008;71(23):1856-61.
    Rabadi, M. H., Coar, P. L., Lukin, M., Lesser, M., & Blass, J. P. (2008). Intensive nutritional supplements can improve outcomes in stroke rehabilitation. Neurology, 71(23), pp. 1856-61. doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000327092.39422.3c.
    Rabadi MH, et al. Intensive Nutritional Supplements Can Improve Outcomes in Stroke Rehabilitation. Neurology. 2008 Dec 2;71(23):1856-61. PubMed PMID: 18946003.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Intensive nutritional supplements can improve outcomes in stroke rehabilitation. AU - Rabadi,M H, AU - Coar,P L, AU - Lukin,M, AU - Lesser,M, AU - Blass,J P, Y1 - 2008/10/22/ PY - 2008/10/24/pubmed PY - 2009/4/9/medline PY - 2008/10/24/entrez SP - 1856 EP - 61 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 71 IS - 23 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Poor nutrition is a common complication of strokes severe enough to require inpatient rehabilitation. We therefore tested whether intensive nutritional supplements given to undernourished patients from the time of their admission to a specialized stroke rehabilitation service would improve patient outcomes. METHODS: Randomized, prospective, double-blind, single center study comparing intensive nutritional supplementation to routine nutritional supplementation in 116 undernourished patients admitted to a stroke service. The analysis included the 90% of patients who were not lost to follow-up due to acute or subacute hospitalization (n = 102; 51 in each group). The nutritional supplements are commercially available and Food and Drug Administration approved. The primary outcome variable was change in total score on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The secondary outcome measurements included the FIM motor and cognitive subscores, length of stay (taken from day of admission), 2-minute and 6-minute timed walk tests measured at admission and on discharge, and discharge disposition (home/not home). RESULTS: Patients receiving intensive nutritional supplementation improved more than those on standard nutritional supplements on measures of motor function (total FIM, FIM motor subscore, 2-minute and 6-minute timed walk tests, all significant at p < 0.002). They did not, however, improve on measures of cognition (FIM cognition score). A higher proportion of patients who received the intensive nutritional supplementation went home compared to those on standard supplementation (p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Intensive nutritional supplementation, using readily available commercial preparations, improves motor recovery in previously undernourished patients receiving intensive in-patient rehabilitation after stroke. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18946003/full_citation L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18946003 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -