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Influence of dietary vitamin K intake on subtherapeutic oral anticoagulant therapy.

Abstract

It is unclear what advice should be given to patients using vitamin K antagonists with respect to dietary vitamin K intake. We performed a nested case-control study in patients attending a Dutch anticoagulation clinic, to determine the association between vitamin K intake and subtherapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) values and the interaction between usual and recent vitamin K intake. Compared to patients with a normal usual vitamin K intake, those with a high vitamin K intake had a decreased risk of a subtherapeutic INR [Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56-1.16] and patients with a low vitamin K intake an increased risk (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.79-2.25). In patients with a low usual vitamin K intake, recent vitamin K intake was twice as high in cases as in controls (164 vs. 85 microg/d). Such a difference was not observed in patients with a normal or high usual vitamin K intake. Our results suggest that a high vitamin K intake reduces the risk of a low INR by lessening the influence of incidental consumption of vitamin K rich food on the INR. These findings support the recommendation for patients on vitamin K antagonists to eat a sufficient amount of vitamin-K containing foods.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

    ,

    Source

    British journal of haematology 149:4 2010 May pg 598-605

    MeSH

    Administration, Oral
    Adult
    Aged
    Anticoagulants
    Blood Coagulation
    Case-Control Studies
    Diet
    Drug Interactions
    Female
    Humans
    International Normalized Ratio
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Vitamin K

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20151978

    Citation

    Rombouts, Eva K., et al. "Influence of Dietary Vitamin K Intake On Subtherapeutic Oral Anticoagulant Therapy." British Journal of Haematology, vol. 149, no. 4, 2010, pp. 598-605.
    Rombouts EK, Rosendaal FR, van der Meer FJ. Influence of dietary vitamin K intake on subtherapeutic oral anticoagulant therapy. Br J Haematol. 2010;149(4):598-605.
    Rombouts, E. K., Rosendaal, F. R., & van der Meer, F. J. (2010). Influence of dietary vitamin K intake on subtherapeutic oral anticoagulant therapy. British Journal of Haematology, 149(4), pp. 598-605. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2141.2010.08108.x.
    Rombouts EK, Rosendaal FR, van der Meer FJ. Influence of Dietary Vitamin K Intake On Subtherapeutic Oral Anticoagulant Therapy. Br J Haematol. 2010;149(4):598-605. PubMed PMID: 20151978.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of dietary vitamin K intake on subtherapeutic oral anticoagulant therapy. AU - Rombouts,Eva K, AU - Rosendaal,Frits R, AU - van der Meer,Felix J M, Y1 - 2010/02/11/ PY - 2010/2/16/entrez PY - 2010/2/16/pubmed PY - 2010/7/10/medline SP - 598 EP - 605 JF - British journal of haematology JO - Br. J. Haematol. VL - 149 IS - 4 N2 - It is unclear what advice should be given to patients using vitamin K antagonists with respect to dietary vitamin K intake. We performed a nested case-control study in patients attending a Dutch anticoagulation clinic, to determine the association between vitamin K intake and subtherapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) values and the interaction between usual and recent vitamin K intake. Compared to patients with a normal usual vitamin K intake, those with a high vitamin K intake had a decreased risk of a subtherapeutic INR [Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56-1.16] and patients with a low vitamin K intake an increased risk (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 0.79-2.25). In patients with a low usual vitamin K intake, recent vitamin K intake was twice as high in cases as in controls (164 vs. 85 microg/d). Such a difference was not observed in patients with a normal or high usual vitamin K intake. Our results suggest that a high vitamin K intake reduces the risk of a low INR by lessening the influence of incidental consumption of vitamin K rich food on the INR. These findings support the recommendation for patients on vitamin K antagonists to eat a sufficient amount of vitamin-K containing foods. SN - 1365-2141 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20151978/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2010.08108.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -