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Exercise for dysmenorrhoea.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2010; (2):CD004142CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dysmenorrhoea is characterised by cramping lower abdominal pain that may radiate to the lower back and upper thighs and is commonly associated with nausea, headache, fatigue and diarrhoea. Physical exercise has been suggested as a non-medical approach to the management of these symptoms.

OBJECTIVES

To assess the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea.

SEARCH STRATEGY

A search was conducted using the methodology of the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (August 2009). CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched. Handsearching of relevant bibliographies and reference lists was also conducted.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Randomised controlled trials comparing exercise with a control or no intervention in women with dysmenorrhoea.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Trials were independently selected and data extracted by two review authors.

MAIN RESULTS

Four potential trials were identified of which one was included in the review. The available data could only be included as a narrative description. There appeared to be some evidence from the trial that exercise reduced the Moos' Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) score during the menstrual phase (P < 0.05) and resulted in a sustained decrease in symptoms over the three observed cycles (P < 0.05).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS

The results of this review are limited to a single randomised trial of limited quality and with a small sample size. The data should be interpreted with caution and further research is required to investigate the hypothesis that exercise reduces the symptoms associated with dysmenorrhoea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Auckland, FMHS, Auckland, New Zealand.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20166071

Citation

Brown, Julie, and Stephen Brown. "Exercise for Dysmenorrhoea." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2010, p. CD004142.
Brown J, Brown S. Exercise for dysmenorrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010.
Brown, J., & Brown, S. (2010). Exercise for dysmenorrhoea. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2), p. CD004142. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004142.pub2.
Brown J, Brown S. Exercise for Dysmenorrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Feb 17;(2)CD004142. PubMed PMID: 20166071.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise for dysmenorrhoea. AU - Brown,Julie, AU - Brown,Stephen, Y1 - 2010/02/17/ PY - 2010/2/19/entrez PY - 2010/2/19/pubmed PY - 2010/4/20/medline SP - CD004142 EP - CD004142 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dysmenorrhoea is characterised by cramping lower abdominal pain that may radiate to the lower back and upper thighs and is commonly associated with nausea, headache, fatigue and diarrhoea. Physical exercise has been suggested as a non-medical approach to the management of these symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea. SEARCH STRATEGY: A search was conducted using the methodology of the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (August 2009). CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched. Handsearching of relevant bibliographies and reference lists was also conducted. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing exercise with a control or no intervention in women with dysmenorrhoea. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Trials were independently selected and data extracted by two review authors. MAIN RESULTS: Four potential trials were identified of which one was included in the review. The available data could only be included as a narrative description. There appeared to be some evidence from the trial that exercise reduced the Moos' Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) score during the menstrual phase (P < 0.05) and resulted in a sustained decrease in symptoms over the three observed cycles (P < 0.05). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The results of this review are limited to a single randomised trial of limited quality and with a small sample size. The data should be interpreted with caution and further research is required to investigate the hypothesis that exercise reduces the symptoms associated with dysmenorrhoea. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20166071/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD004142.pub2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -