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Dietary antioxidants and long-term risk of dementia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Rotterdam Study previously found that higher dietary intakes of vitamins E and C related to lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) over 6 years of follow-up.

OBJECTIVE

To study consumption of major dietary antioxidants relative to long-term risk of dementia.

DESIGN

Population-based prospective cohort study.

SETTING

The Rotterdam Study in the Netherlands.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 5395 participants, 55 years and older, who were free of dementia and provided dietary information at study baseline.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Incidence of dementia and AD, based on internationally accepted criteria, relative to dietary intake of vitamin E, vitamin C, beta carotene, and flavonoids.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up period of 9.6 years, dementia developed in 465 participants, of whom 365 were diagnosed as having AD. In multivariate models adjusted for age, education, apolipoprotein E epsilon4 genotype, total energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking habits, body mass index, and supplement use, higher intake of vitamin E at study baseline was associated with lower long-term risk of dementia (P = .02 for trend). Compared with participants in the lowest tertile of vitamin E intake, those in the highest tertile were 25% less likely to develop dementia (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.95 with adjustment for potential confounders). Dietary intake levels of vitamin C, beta carotene, and flavonoids were not associated with dementia risk after multivariate adjustment (P > .99 for trend for vitamin C and beta carotene and P = .60 for trend for flavonoids). Results were similar when risk for AD was specifically assessed.

CONCLUSION

Higher intake of foods rich in vitamin E may modestly reduce long-term risk of dementia and AD.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Archives of neurology 67:7 2010 Jul pg 819-25

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Antioxidants
    Apolipoproteins E
    Cohort Studies
    Community Health Planning
    Dementia
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Flavonoids
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Netherlands
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Vitamins
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20625087

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary antioxidants and long-term risk of dementia. AU - Devore,Elizabeth E, AU - Grodstein,Francine, AU - van Rooij,Frank J A, AU - Hofman,Albert, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Witteman,Jacqueline C M, AU - Breteler,Monique M B, PY - 2010/7/14/entrez PY - 2010/7/14/pubmed PY - 2010/8/7/medline SP - 819 EP - 25 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 67 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Rotterdam Study previously found that higher dietary intakes of vitamins E and C related to lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) over 6 years of follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To study consumption of major dietary antioxidants relative to long-term risk of dementia. DESIGN: Population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Rotterdam Study in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 5395 participants, 55 years and older, who were free of dementia and provided dietary information at study baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of dementia and AD, based on internationally accepted criteria, relative to dietary intake of vitamin E, vitamin C, beta carotene, and flavonoids. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 9.6 years, dementia developed in 465 participants, of whom 365 were diagnosed as having AD. In multivariate models adjusted for age, education, apolipoprotein E epsilon4 genotype, total energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking habits, body mass index, and supplement use, higher intake of vitamin E at study baseline was associated with lower long-term risk of dementia (P = .02 for trend). Compared with participants in the lowest tertile of vitamin E intake, those in the highest tertile were 25% less likely to develop dementia (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.95 with adjustment for potential confounders). Dietary intake levels of vitamin C, beta carotene, and flavonoids were not associated with dementia risk after multivariate adjustment (P > .99 for trend for vitamin C and beta carotene and P = .60 for trend for flavonoids). Results were similar when risk for AD was specifically assessed. CONCLUSION: Higher intake of foods rich in vitamin E may modestly reduce long-term risk of dementia and AD. SN - 1538-3687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20625087/full_citation L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/archneurol.2010.144 ER -