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Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study.

Abstract

Some dietary factors could be involved as cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis, but evidence is inconclusive. There are no data about the effect of fruits and vegetables intake (F&V) on cervical cancer from cohort studies. We examined the association between the intake of F&V and selected nutrients and the incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive squamous cervical cancer (ISC) in a prospective study of 299,649 women, participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A calibration study was used to control measurement errors in the dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 9 years of follow-up, 253 ISC and 817 CIS cases were diagnosed. In the calibrated model, we observed a statistically significant inverse association of ISC with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total fruits (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.98) and a statistically nonsignificant inverse association with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total vegetables (HR 0.85: 95% CI 0.65-1.10). Statistically nonsignificant inverse associations were also observed for leafy vegetables, root vegetables, garlic and onions, citrus fruits, vitamin C, vitamin E and retinol for ISC. No association was found regarding beta-carotene, vitamin D and folic acid for ISC. None of the dietary factors examined was associated with CIS. Our study suggests a possible protective role of fruit intake and other dietary factors on ISC that need to be confirmed on a larger number of ISC cases.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. cagonzalez@iconcologia.net

    , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 129:2 2011 Jul 15 pg 449-59

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carcinoma
    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
    Diet
    Europe
    Female
    Folic Acid
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fruit
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Neoplasm Invasiveness
    Nutrition Surveys
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
    Vegetables
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin E
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20853322

    Citation

    González, Carlos A., et al. "Dietary Factors and in Situ and Invasive Cervical Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Study." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 129, no. 2, 2011, pp. 449-59.
    González CA, Travier N, Luján-Barroso L, et al. Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. Int J Cancer. 2011;129(2):449-59.
    González, C. A., Travier, N., Luján-Barroso, L., Castellsagué, X., Bosch, F. X., Roura, E., ... Riboli, E. (2011). Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. International Journal of Cancer, 129(2), pp. 449-59. doi:10.1002/ijc.25679.
    González CA, et al. Dietary Factors and in Situ and Invasive Cervical Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition Study. Int J Cancer. 2011 Jul 15;129(2):449-59. PubMed PMID: 20853322.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors and in situ and invasive cervical cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study. AU - González,Carlos A, AU - Travier,Noemie, AU - Luján-Barroso,Leila, AU - Castellsagué,Xavier, AU - Bosch,F Xavier, AU - Roura,Esther, AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita,H Bas, AU - Palli,Domenico, AU - Boeing,Heiner, AU - Pala,Valeria, AU - Sacerdote,Carlotta, AU - Tumino,Rosario, AU - Panico,Salvatore, AU - Manjer,Jonas, AU - Dillner,Joakim, AU - Hallmans,Göran, AU - Kjellberg,Lennart, AU - Sanchez,María-José, AU - Altzibar,Jone M, AU - Barricarte,Aurelio, AU - Navarro,Carmen, AU - Rodriguez,Laudina, AU - Allen,Naomi, AU - Key,Timothy J, AU - Kaaks,Rudolf, AU - Rohrmann,Sabine, AU - Overvad,Kim, AU - Olsen,Anja, AU - Tjønneland,Anne, AU - Munk,Christian, AU - Kjaer,Susanne Krüger, AU - Peeters,Petra H M, AU - van Duijnhoven,Fränzel J B, AU - Clavel-Chapelon,Françoise, AU - Boutron-Ruault,Marie-Christine, AU - Trichopoulou,Antonia, AU - Benetou,Vasiliki, AU - Naska,Androniki, AU - Lund,Eiliv, AU - Engeset,Dagrun, AU - Skeie,Guri, AU - Franceschi,Silvia, AU - Slimani,Nadia, AU - Rinaldi,Sabina, AU - Riboli,Elio, Y1 - 2010/11/18/ PY - 2010/03/03/received PY - 2010/06/10/accepted PY - 2010/9/21/entrez PY - 2010/9/21/pubmed PY - 2011/8/5/medline SP - 449 EP - 59 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 129 IS - 2 N2 - Some dietary factors could be involved as cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis, but evidence is inconclusive. There are no data about the effect of fruits and vegetables intake (F&V) on cervical cancer from cohort studies. We examined the association between the intake of F&V and selected nutrients and the incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive squamous cervical cancer (ISC) in a prospective study of 299,649 women, participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A calibration study was used to control measurement errors in the dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 9 years of follow-up, 253 ISC and 817 CIS cases were diagnosed. In the calibrated model, we observed a statistically significant inverse association of ISC with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total fruits (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72-0.98) and a statistically nonsignificant inverse association with a daily increase in intake of 100 g of total vegetables (HR 0.85: 95% CI 0.65-1.10). Statistically nonsignificant inverse associations were also observed for leafy vegetables, root vegetables, garlic and onions, citrus fruits, vitamin C, vitamin E and retinol for ISC. No association was found regarding beta-carotene, vitamin D and folic acid for ISC. None of the dietary factors examined was associated with CIS. Our study suggests a possible protective role of fruit intake and other dietary factors on ISC that need to be confirmed on a larger number of ISC cases. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20853322/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25679 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -