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Dietary factors and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: a pooled analysis of two prospective studies.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2010; 19(10):2680-4CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Other than male sex, family history, advanced age, and race, risk factors for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) are unknown. Very few studies have investigated diet in relation to these leukemias, and no consistent associations are known.

METHODS

Using two large prospective population-based studies, we evaluated the relationship between diet and CLL/SLL risk. Among 525,982 men and women free of cancer at enrollment, we identified 1,129 incident CLL/SLL cases during 11.2 years of follow-up.

RESULTS

We found no associations between total fat, saturated fat, fiber, red meat, processed meat, fruit, or vegetable intake and risk of CLL/SLL. We noted a suggestive positive association between body mass index and CLL/SLL (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.36).

CONCLUSION

We did not find any associations between food or nutrient intake and CLL/SLL.

IMPACT

Our large prospective study indicates that diet may not play a role in CLL/SLL development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20929883

Citation

Tsai, Huei-Ting, et al. "Dietary Factors and Risk of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: a Pooled Analysis of Two Prospective Studies." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 19, no. 10, 2010, pp. 2680-4.
Tsai HT, Cross AJ, Graubard BI, et al. Dietary factors and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: a pooled analysis of two prospective studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(10):2680-4.
Tsai, H. T., Cross, A. J., Graubard, B. I., Oken, M., Schatzkin, A., & Caporaso, N. E. (2010). Dietary factors and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: a pooled analysis of two prospective studies. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 19(10), pp. 2680-4. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0585.
Tsai HT, et al. Dietary Factors and Risk of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: a Pooled Analysis of Two Prospective Studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(10):2680-4. PubMed PMID: 20929883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: a pooled analysis of two prospective studies. AU - Tsai,Huei-Ting, AU - Cross,Amanda J, AU - Graubard,Barry I, AU - Oken,Martin, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Caporaso,Neil E, PY - 2010/10/9/entrez PY - 2010/10/12/pubmed PY - 2011/2/23/medline SP - 2680 EP - 4 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 19 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Other than male sex, family history, advanced age, and race, risk factors for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) are unknown. Very few studies have investigated diet in relation to these leukemias, and no consistent associations are known. METHODS: Using two large prospective population-based studies, we evaluated the relationship between diet and CLL/SLL risk. Among 525,982 men and women free of cancer at enrollment, we identified 1,129 incident CLL/SLL cases during 11.2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: We found no associations between total fat, saturated fat, fiber, red meat, processed meat, fruit, or vegetable intake and risk of CLL/SLL. We noted a suggestive positive association between body mass index and CLL/SLL (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.36). CONCLUSION: We did not find any associations between food or nutrient intake and CLL/SLL. IMPACT: Our large prospective study indicates that diet may not play a role in CLL/SLL development. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20929883/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20929883 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -