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Physical activity improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Physical activity has been shown to be effective in the treatment of conditions, such as fibromyalgia and depression. Although these conditions are associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), no study has assessed the effect of physical activity on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in IBS. The aim was to study the effect of physical activity on symptoms in IBS.

METHODS

We randomized 102 patients to a physical activity group and a control group. Patients of the physical activity group were instructed by a physiotherapist to increase their physical activity, and those of the control group were instructed to maintain their lifestyle. The primary end point was to assess the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS).

RESULTS

A total of 38 (73.7% women, median age 38.5 (19-65) years) patients in the control group and 37 (75.7% women, median age 36 (18-65) years) patients in the physical activity group completed the study. There was a significant difference in the improvement in the IBS-SSS score between the physical activity group and the control group (-51 (-130 and 49) vs. -5 (-101 and 118), P=0.003). The proportion of patients with increased IBS symptom severity during the study was significantly larger in the control group than in the physical activity group.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased physical activity improves GI symptoms in IBS. Physically active patients with IBS will face less symptom deterioration compared with physically inactive patients. Physical activity should be used as a primary treatment modality in IBS.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Anxiety
    Body Weight
    Defecation
    Depression
    Exercise
    Female
    Humans
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Oxygen Consumption
    Quality of Life
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21206488

    Citation

    Johannesson, Elisabet, et al. "Physical Activity Improves Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Randomized Controlled Trial." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 106, no. 5, 2011, pp. 915-22.
    Johannesson E, Simrén M, Strid H, et al. Physical activity improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Gastroenterol. 2011;106(5):915-22.
    Johannesson, E., Simrén, M., Strid, H., Bajor, A., & Sadik, R. (2011). Physical activity improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 106(5), pp. 915-22. doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.480.
    Johannesson E, et al. Physical Activity Improves Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Am J Gastroenterol. 2011;106(5):915-22. PubMed PMID: 21206488.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Johannesson,Elisabet, AU - Simrén,Magnus, AU - Strid,Hans, AU - Bajor,Antal, AU - Sadik,Riadh, Y1 - 2011/01/04/ PY - 2011/1/6/entrez PY - 2011/1/6/pubmed PY - 2011/6/29/medline SP - 915 EP - 22 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 106 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Physical activity has been shown to be effective in the treatment of conditions, such as fibromyalgia and depression. Although these conditions are associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), no study has assessed the effect of physical activity on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in IBS. The aim was to study the effect of physical activity on symptoms in IBS. METHODS: We randomized 102 patients to a physical activity group and a control group. Patients of the physical activity group were instructed by a physiotherapist to increase their physical activity, and those of the control group were instructed to maintain their lifestyle. The primary end point was to assess the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS). RESULTS: A total of 38 (73.7% women, median age 38.5 (19-65) years) patients in the control group and 37 (75.7% women, median age 36 (18-65) years) patients in the physical activity group completed the study. There was a significant difference in the improvement in the IBS-SSS score between the physical activity group and the control group (-51 (-130 and 49) vs. -5 (-101 and 118), P=0.003). The proportion of patients with increased IBS symptom severity during the study was significantly larger in the control group than in the physical activity group. CONCLUSIONS: Increased physical activity improves GI symptoms in IBS. Physically active patients with IBS will face less symptom deterioration compared with physically inactive patients. Physical activity should be used as a primary treatment modality in IBS. SN - 1572-0241 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21206488/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=21206488 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -