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Diet, vegetarianism, and cataract risk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Age-related cataract is a major cause of morbidity. Previous studies of diet and cataract risk have focused on specific nutrients or healthy eating indexes but not on identifiable dietary groups such as vegetarians.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the association between diet and cataract risk in a population that has a wide range of diets and includes a high proportion of vegetarians.

DESIGN

We used Cox proportional hazards regression to study cataract risk in relation to baseline dietary and lifestyle characteristics of 27,670 self-reported nondiabetic participants aged ≥40 y at recruitment in the Oxford (United Kingdom) arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Oxford) by using data from the Hospital Episode Statistics in England and Scottish Morbidity Records.

RESULTS

There was a strong relation between cataract risk and diet group, with a progressive decrease in risk of cataract in high meat eaters to low meat eaters, fish eaters (participants who ate fish but not meat), vegetarians, and vegans. After multivariable adjustment, incidence rate ratios (95% CIs) for moderate meat eaters (50-99 g meat/d), low meat eaters (<50 g meat/d), fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans compared with high-meat eaters (≥100 g meat/d) were 0.96 (0.84, 1.11), 0.85 (0.72, 0.99), 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), 0.70 (0.58, 0.84), and 0.60 (0.38, 0.96), respectively (P < 0.001 for heterogeneity). Associations between cataract risk and intakes of selected nutrients and foods generally reflected the strong association with diet group.

CONCLUSION

Vegetarians were at lower risk of cataract than were meat eaters in this cohort of health-conscious British residents.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. paul.appleby@ceu.ox.ac.uk

    ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Cataract
    Cohort Studies
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Life Style
    Male
    Meat
    Medical Records
    Middle Aged
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Registries
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United Kingdom
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21430115

    Citation

    Appleby, Paul N., et al. "Diet, Vegetarianism, and Cataract Risk." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 93, no. 5, 2011, pp. 1128-35.
    Appleby PN, Allen NE, Key TJ. Diet, vegetarianism, and cataract risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(5):1128-35.
    Appleby, P. N., Allen, N. E., & Key, T. J. (2011). Diet, vegetarianism, and cataract risk. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 93(5), pp. 1128-35. doi:10.3945/ajcn.110.004028.
    Appleby PN, Allen NE, Key TJ. Diet, Vegetarianism, and Cataract Risk. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(5):1128-35. PubMed PMID: 21430115.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet, vegetarianism, and cataract risk. AU - Appleby,Paul N, AU - Allen,Naomi E, AU - Key,Timothy J, Y1 - 2011/03/23/ PY - 2011/3/25/entrez PY - 2011/3/25/pubmed PY - 2011/7/16/medline SP - 1128 EP - 35 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 93 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Age-related cataract is a major cause of morbidity. Previous studies of diet and cataract risk have focused on specific nutrients or healthy eating indexes but not on identifiable dietary groups such as vegetarians. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between diet and cataract risk in a population that has a wide range of diets and includes a high proportion of vegetarians. DESIGN: We used Cox proportional hazards regression to study cataract risk in relation to baseline dietary and lifestyle characteristics of 27,670 self-reported nondiabetic participants aged ≥40 y at recruitment in the Oxford (United Kingdom) arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Oxford) by using data from the Hospital Episode Statistics in England and Scottish Morbidity Records. RESULTS: There was a strong relation between cataract risk and diet group, with a progressive decrease in risk of cataract in high meat eaters to low meat eaters, fish eaters (participants who ate fish but not meat), vegetarians, and vegans. After multivariable adjustment, incidence rate ratios (95% CIs) for moderate meat eaters (50-99 g meat/d), low meat eaters (<50 g meat/d), fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans compared with high-meat eaters (≥100 g meat/d) were 0.96 (0.84, 1.11), 0.85 (0.72, 0.99), 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), 0.70 (0.58, 0.84), and 0.60 (0.38, 0.96), respectively (P < 0.001 for heterogeneity). Associations between cataract risk and intakes of selected nutrients and foods generally reflected the strong association with diet group. CONCLUSION: Vegetarians were at lower risk of cataract than were meat eaters in this cohort of health-conscious British residents. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21430115/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.110.004028 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -