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Serum selenium, genetic variation in selenoenzymes, and risk of colorectal cancer: primary analysis from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and meta-analysis.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2011; 20(9):1822-30CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Selenium may prevent colorectal cancer. However, several previous studies are small and few investigated the association between selenium and colorectal cancer among women whose selenium metabolism may differ from men. Furthermore, genetic variants in selenoenzymes may be associated with colorectal cancer risk.

METHODS

This nested case-control study investigated whether serum selenium concentration and genetic variants in five selenoenzymes (glutathione peroxidase 1-4 and selenoprotein P) were associated with colorectal cancer risk in 804 colorectal cancer cases and 805 matched controls from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study. A meta-analysis was conducted to compare the WHI result with previous studies including 12 observational studies and two clinical trials on selenium.

RESULTS

Within the WHI, selenium concentrations were relatively high (mean = 135.6 μg/L) and were not associated with colorectal cancer risk (P(trend) = 0.10); the adjusted OR comparing the fifth with first quintile was 1.26 (95% CI, 0.91-1.73). Moreover, genetic variants in selenoenzymes were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Consistent with the finding in WHI, our meta-analysis showed no association between selenium and colorectal tumor risk in women (OR = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.79-1.18) comparing the highest quantile with the lowest); however, in men, there was a significant inverse association (OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.82) (P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

Consistent with previous studies, we observed no protective effect of selenium on colorectal cancer among women.

IMPACT

Our analyses suggest that a population with relatively high selenium concentrations, especially women, would not benefit from increasing selenium intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Public Health Science Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21765007

Citation

Takata, Yumie, et al. "Serum Selenium, Genetic Variation in Selenoenzymes, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Primary Analysis From the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and Meta-analysis." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 20, no. 9, 2011, pp. 1822-30.
Takata Y, Kristal AR, King IB, et al. Serum selenium, genetic variation in selenoenzymes, and risk of colorectal cancer: primary analysis from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(9):1822-30.
Takata, Y., Kristal, A. R., King, I. B., Song, X., Diamond, A. M., Foster, C. B., ... Peters, U. (2011). Serum selenium, genetic variation in selenoenzymes, and risk of colorectal cancer: primary analysis from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 20(9), pp. 1822-30. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0364.
Takata Y, et al. Serum Selenium, Genetic Variation in Selenoenzymes, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Primary Analysis From the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and Meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(9):1822-30. PubMed PMID: 21765007.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum selenium, genetic variation in selenoenzymes, and risk of colorectal cancer: primary analysis from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and meta-analysis. AU - Takata,Yumie, AU - Kristal,Alan R, AU - King,Irena B, AU - Song,Xiaoling, AU - Diamond,Alan M, AU - Foster,Charles B, AU - Hutter,Carolyn M, AU - Hsu,Li, AU - Duggan,David J, AU - Langer,Robert D, AU - Petrovitch,Helen, AU - Shikany,James M, AU - Vaughan,Thomas L, AU - Lampe,Johanna W, AU - Prentice,Ross L, AU - Peters,Ulrike, Y1 - 2011/07/15/ PY - 2011/7/19/entrez PY - 2011/7/19/pubmed PY - 2012/3/23/medline SP - 1822 EP - 30 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 20 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent colorectal cancer. However, several previous studies are small and few investigated the association between selenium and colorectal cancer among women whose selenium metabolism may differ from men. Furthermore, genetic variants in selenoenzymes may be associated with colorectal cancer risk. METHODS: This nested case-control study investigated whether serum selenium concentration and genetic variants in five selenoenzymes (glutathione peroxidase 1-4 and selenoprotein P) were associated with colorectal cancer risk in 804 colorectal cancer cases and 805 matched controls from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study. A meta-analysis was conducted to compare the WHI result with previous studies including 12 observational studies and two clinical trials on selenium. RESULTS: Within the WHI, selenium concentrations were relatively high (mean = 135.6 μg/L) and were not associated with colorectal cancer risk (P(trend) = 0.10); the adjusted OR comparing the fifth with first quintile was 1.26 (95% CI, 0.91-1.73). Moreover, genetic variants in selenoenzymes were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Consistent with the finding in WHI, our meta-analysis showed no association between selenium and colorectal tumor risk in women (OR = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.79-1.18) comparing the highest quantile with the lowest); however, in men, there was a significant inverse association (OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.82) (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Consistent with previous studies, we observed no protective effect of selenium on colorectal cancer among women. IMPACT: Our analyses suggest that a population with relatively high selenium concentrations, especially women, would not benefit from increasing selenium intake. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21765007/full_citation L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21765007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -